How Nature Accidentally Created the Perfect Animal

Casual Geographic
13 Mar 202414:33

Summary

TLDRThe script celebrates the unique and extraordinary nature of elephants, highlighting their complex features, intelligence, and abilities. It delves into their evolutionary history, unique physical attributes like their trunk with its incredible muscle control, and their impressive skills such as swimming and infrasound communication. The narrative also touches on their emotional intelligence, memory, and empathy, emphasizing their capacity for altruism and mourning. The speaker passionately argues for the perfection of elephants as creatures and advocates against their captivity, suggesting that the world benefits from their freedom and well-being.

Takeaways

  • 🐘 Elephants are considered one of the most unique and aesthetically atypical animals on Earth due to their distinctive features and abilities.
  • 🦷 The evolution of elephants has led to various adaptations, such as their spade-shaped jaw and tusks, which have changed over time.
  • 🌞 Elephants have sensitive skin and use dust baths and mud masks to protect against the harsh African sun, with the color of the mud affecting their appearance.
  • 🦡 Elephant tails are designed to ward off insects and have a unique texture that some describe as similar to cheap plastic.
  • 🌑️ Elephants have a sparse amount of hair on their heads which helps with heat dissipation, with Asian elephants having more hair than their African counterparts.
  • πŸ‘‚ Elephants possess an incredible trunk with around 40,000 muscles and 400,000 nerves, allowing for both strength and delicate tasks.
  • 🏊 Elephants are excellent swimmers, capable of swimming for hours and covering miles, which is unusual for their size.
  • πŸ”Š Elephants communicate using infrasonic sounds that can travel miles and are picked up through their feet, with different calls for various social interactions.
  • 🧠 Elephants have exceptional memory and intelligence, using their experiences to guide their herd to water sources and food during challenging times.
  • πŸ’‘ Elephants display empathy and altruism, mourning their dead, adopting orphans, and even showing protective behaviors towards humans and other animals.

Q & A

  • What are some unique physical features of elephants that make them aesthetically atypical?

    -Elephants have several unique physical features that make them stand out. These include their four-legged behemoth bodies, massive size comparable to a semi-truck, a long trunk that resembles a leviathan, a tail that can induce trypophobia, and tusks that seem like nature's failed attempts. They also possess superpowers and intelligence that may rival humans.

  • How did the ancient ancestor of elephants, the platybelodon, differ from modern elephants?

    -The platybelodon, an ancient ancestor of elephants, had a facial configuration similar to a shovel, which allowed them to efficiently strip trees of their bark. This is a significant difference from modern elephants, who have a more refined and complex trunk structure.

  • What is the significance of an elephant's skin and how does it adapt to the environment?

    -An elephant's skin is sensitive despite its thickness, and it adapts to the environment through dust baths and mud masks, which protect against the harsh African sun. The color of the mud can change the appearance of their skin, and their skin retains water, helping them survive in arid conditions.

  • Why do elephants have hair on their heads and what is its purpose?

    -Elephants have hair on their heads that serves to transfer heat away from their bodies. This is an important adaptation as it helps them stay cool in hot climates, and in some cases, it can reduce body temperature by over 20%.

  • How do elephants use their trunk and what abilities does it provide them?

    -An elephant's trunk is a highly versatile appendage with around 40,000 muscles and 400,000 nerves. It allows them to perform a variety of tasks, from lifting heavy objects to delicately plucking grass. The trunk is also prehensile, enabling elephants to grasp and manipulate objects, and it plays a crucial role in their social interactions and communication.

  • What are some of the superpowers and abilities that elephants possess?

    -Elephants possess a range of superpowers and abilities, including super strength, an excellent sense of smell that can detect water sources from miles away, exceptional swimming skills, infrasonic hearing that allows them to communicate over long distances, and a remarkable memory that helps them navigate and find resources.

  • How does an elephant's matriarch use her intelligence and memory to lead her herd?

    -The matriarch of an elephant herd uses her intelligence and memory to guide her family to water sources at the right times of the year. Her knowledge and experience are critical for the survival of the herd, as she must remember the locations and conditions of various watering holes to ensure the herd's access to water during the dry season.

  • What evidence suggests that elephants have high levels of emotional intelligence and empathy?

    -Elephants demonstrate high levels of emotional intelligence and empathy through behaviors such as mourning the dead, adopting orphans into their herds, and showing concern for injured or sleeping humans. They have been known to hold vigils for deceased humans who were close to them and even attempt to rescue animals of other species in distress.

  • How do elephants use infrasound calls for communication and what are some examples of these calls?

    -Elephants use infrasound calls for long-distance communication, which are inaudible to humans but can be felt through their feet. These calls have different meanings and can include greetings, signals to move the herd, and even specific calls to celebrate events like successful mating.

  • What is the significance of elephants passing the mirror self-awareness test and another awareness test conducted by the University of Cambridge?

    -Elephants passing the mirror self-awareness test and the University of Cambridge's awareness test demonstrates their high level of self-awareness and cognitive abilities. In the Cambridge study, elephants showed the ability to understand that their reflection was not another elephant and needed to step off a mat to pass a stick, indicating a level of self-realization that is rare among animals.

  • What is the author's stance on elephants in captivity and why?

    -The author is against keeping elephants in captivity, especially in zoos. They argue that elephants are highly intelligent, social animals that typically travel large distances and thrive in their natural habitats. Captivity often fails to provide the necessary mental and physical stimulation, leading to a poor quality of life for these majestic creatures.

Outlines

00:00

🐘 The Elephant's Unique Evolution and Features

This paragraph delves into the peculiarities of the elephant, highlighting its unusual appearance and evolutionary adaptations. It humorously suggests that if Helen Keller were alive, she might be astonished by the elephant's aesthetically atypical features, such as its massive size, trunk, and tusks. The paragraph also touches on the elephant's ancient ancestor, the platybelodon, and its spade-like jaw. It emphasizes the elephant's unique characteristics, such as its intelligence, strength, and the ability to adapt to various environments, making it a contender for the weirdest and most perfect animal in nature.

05:00

πŸ’ͺ Elephant Superpowers and Abilities

The second paragraph focuses on the elephant's impressive array of abilities and superpowers. It begins by acknowledging the elephant's super strength, which allows it to humble entire trees for nourishment. The paragraph then discusses the elephant's exceptional sense of smell, which can detect food and water sources from miles away. It also covers the elephant's surprising swimming prowess and its ability to communicate through infrasonic vibrations that can travel long distances. The paragraph highlights the elephant's remarkable memory, which is crucial for survival, especially in locating water sources during dry seasons. Additionally, it touches on the elephant's intelligence, problem-solving skills, and capacity to learn from experiences, which are passed down through generations.

10:06

🧠 Elephant Intelligence, Empathy, and Altruism

The final paragraph explores the cognitive and emotional aspects of elephants, emphasizing their high level of intelligence and self-awareness. It describes how elephants recognize their reflection in the mirror test and demonstrate self-awareness in passing objects, indicating a deep understanding of their own actions. The paragraph also discusses the elephants' empathetic nature, as seen in their mourning behaviors and their ability to form strong social bonds. It mentions instances of elephants showing altruism towards humans and other animals, and the emotional intelligence that sets them apart from other species. The narrative concludes by advocating for the well-being of elephants, suggesting that they are better off in their natural habitats rather than in captivity.

Mindmap

Keywords

πŸ’‘Elephant

The central subject of the video, elephants are described as the most perfect animals in nature due to their unique combination of physical attributes, abilities, and intelligence. They are characterized by their large size, distinctive trunk, and complex social behaviors. The video discusses various aspects of elephants, from their evolution to their current status as intelligent, empathetic creatures.

πŸ’‘National Thai Elephant Day

A day dedicated to celebrating elephants, particularly in Thailand, where they hold cultural and religious significance. The video uses this occasion to delve into the fascinating aspects of elephants, highlighting their importance and the respect they command.

πŸ’‘Trunk

A key feature of an elephant, the trunk is a highly versatile appendage with over 40,000 muscles and 400,000 nerves, allowing for a wide range of functions from heavy lifting to delicate tasks. It is one of the reasons elephants are considered so unique and capable.

πŸ’‘Intelligence

Referring to the cognitive abilities of elephants, which are highlighted in the video as being on par with humans in certain aspects. Elephants display advanced problem-solving skills, memory, and emotional intelligence, including the capacity for empathy and self-awareness.

πŸ’‘Evolution

The process by which elephants have developed their current form and abilities over time. The video discusses the ancient ancestors of elephants and how their features have adapted to their environment, resulting in the unique creatures we see today.

πŸ’‘Social Behavior

Elephants are known for their complex social structures and behaviors, including strong family bonds, communication, and even mourning rituals. The video emphasizes the social nature of elephants and how it contributes to their survival and well-being.

πŸ’‘Physical Attributes

Refers to the distinctive physical characteristics of elephants, such as their size, large ears, and tusks. These attributes play a crucial role in their ability to adapt to various environments and contribute to their status as one of the most unique animals on Earth.

πŸ’‘Conservation

The act of protecting elephants from threats such as poaching and habitat loss. The video touches on the importance of preserving these intelligent creatures and their ecosystems, highlighting the role of conservationists and the negative impact of captivity on elephants.

πŸ’‘Captor

A term used in the context of the video to describe an elephant that has learned to free itself from restraints, illustrating the animal's intelligence and problem-solving abilities. It also implies the potential for elephants to resist human control and assert their autonomy.

πŸ’‘Altruism

Behavior that isζ— η§ηš„ and beneficial to others, even at a potential cost to the individual performing it. In the context of the video, elephants display altruism by adopting orphans, protecting other species, and showing empathy towards humans.

Highlights

Elephants are considered one of the most aesthetically atypical animals on Earth with their unique features.

Ancient ancestors of elephants, like Platybelodon, had a shovel-like facial configuration.

Elephants have evolved to have sensitive skin, which they protect with dust baths and mud masks.

Elephants' skin can change color based on the mud they use, from gold to red.

Asian elephants have more hair than African elephants, which helps with heat transfer.

Elephants have a unique trunk with 40,000 muscles and 400,000 nerves, making it a highly versatile body part.

Elephants are one of the few animals capable of throwing objects with their trunk.

African elephants have large ears with blood vessels that help with temperature regulation.

Elephants have infrasound hearing and can communicate over long distances through low-frequency vibrations.

Elephants have a strong memory, which is crucial for finding water and food sources in their environment.

Elephant herds are led by a matriarch who uses her extensive experience to guide the group.

Elephants are known for their intelligence, often outsmarting humans in various situations.

Some elephants have learned to recognize and react differently to human languages and voices.

Elephants have been observed showing empathy and mourning the dead, demonstrating high emotional intelligence.

Elephants exhibit altruistic behavior, adopting orphans and even protecting humans and other animals.

Elephants are highly social and intelligent creatures, which makes them poorly suited for captivity.

Koshik the elephant imitated his Korean caretaker, showing a level of intelligence and mimicry rarely seen in animals.

Elephants are capable of self-medication, using plants like Boren seed for specific purposes.

Elephants have demonstrated self-awareness by passing a mirror test and understanding their own actions.

Elephants' unique combination of physical features, abilities, and intelligence makes them one of the most fascinating animals in nature.

Transcripts

00:00

if Helen Keller was alive to see what

00:01

this animal looks like she'd probably

00:03

resign from life all over again when you

00:05

think of some of the weirdest most

00:06

aesthetically atypical animals on Earth

00:08

chances are you probably don't think of

00:10

the elephant but imagine trying to

00:12

explain the concept of a four-legged

00:13

Behemoth in a weight class of a semi-

00:15

trck with a leviathan for a nose a

00:17

trypophobic night terror for a tail

00:19

several superpowers and intelligence

00:21

that might just rival our own all while

00:23

flexing the devil's utensils for an

00:24

overbite well in honor of today being

00:26

National Thai Elephant day and elephants

00:28

being my all-time favorite animal here's

00:30

why the bouncers of the Savannah have an

00:32

argument for not just the weirdest but

00:33

maybe even the most perfect animal in

00:35

nature now they didn't always look like

00:37

this and honestly thank the stars for

00:39

second drafts plat belladon was an

00:41

ancient ancestor with the facial

00:43

configuration of a shovel apparently

00:44

having a spork for a jaw allowed them to

00:46

undress a tree for its bark but it also

00:48

makes it look like the subject of a

00:49

Paint and Sip spiked with ls Den you got

00:51

dinum cuz apparently nature played pin

00:53

the teeth on the tusker and it took a

00:55

couple tries technically they're not

00:56

true elephants are more like a distant

00:57

cousin but then again it's not like the

00:59

elephants ual relatives make any more

01:01

sense cuz elephants have the most

01:03

confusing family reunion of any creature

01:05

with their closest kin being the

01:06

definitely not erodent rock hyrax and

01:09

Columbus wet dream the manate and the D

01:11

gong to be fair I guess hyraxes do have

01:13

tusks and apparently manatees have the

01:15

same Nail Tech but elephants are also in

01:17

the same afro teror group as arvar tenrs

01:20

and golden moles yeah you heard that

01:22

right I said mole by the way elephants

01:24

didn't just get less weird looking we

01:26

just got to sensitize to them there is

01:28

no build on Earth quite like the

01:29

elephant and it isn't until you look at

01:30

all that nonsense separately and put it

01:32

back together again that it starts to

01:33

make sense beauty is Skin Deep so that's

01:37

exactly where we're starting this

01:38

picture went viral because many came to

01:40

the conclusion that elephants aren't

01:41

light gray just chronically Ashy and

01:43

that's for a couple of reasons elephants

01:45

can live 70 years in the wild and they

01:47

do that without ever touching lotion a

01:49

day in their life so maybe don't be so

01:50

judgmental but for how thick it is

01:52

elephant's skin is pretty sensitive so

01:54

they'll use dust baths and mud masks to

01:55

protect against their oppressive African

01:57

Sun cuz humans weren't the first to come

01:59

up with skincare and depending on the

02:00

color of the mud you can get an elephant

02:02

straight out of King midas's Palace or a

02:04

herd in red face from the volcanic dust

02:05

of savvo you can also find white

02:07

elephants covered in clay and mud not to

02:09

be confused with the white asian call it

02:11

wasian elephants that were revered by

02:13

royalty also depigmentation means Asian

02:15

elephants have freckles but let me stop

02:16

waffling the skin itself has more cracks

02:18

than a tanorexic and looks suspiciously

02:20

like what a drought in their

02:21

neighborhood looks like and it's because

02:22

the Tiny Network of dermal ditches and

02:24

valleys means their skin retains 10

02:26

times the water it would if they had

02:28

glass skin it's great defense against

02:30

the Sun but not completely against

02:31

insects which brings us to this there's

02:34

two types of people those that know what

02:36

an elephant's tail looks like up close

02:37

and those I owe an apology and probably

02:39

a bill for therapy if you've ever

02:41

touched one it feels like cheap plastic

02:43

so basically a built-in fly satter for

02:44

an animal with no hands and more junk

02:46

than its trunk can reach pause they also

02:49

have hair on their heads and like

02:50

everything else about this padm this too

02:52

has a purpose elephants have about one

02:54

hair per square inch to our 13300 and

02:56

social distancing fur follicles actually

02:58

transfers heat away from from the

03:00

elephant in some cases by over 20%

03:02

that's how you get a baby elephant with

03:03

a better lineup than me you see he

03:04

doesn't have to wear a hat and with

03:06

Asian elephants being hairier they're

03:08

much more liable to grow bangs and score

03:10

an audition on ABY road that doesn't

03:12

even scratch the surface of their

03:13

weirdness the African variety has large

03:15

ears with blood vessels that also helps

03:17

them with the heat while also looking

03:19

suspiciously like the continent they

03:20

live on that heat is why they're also

03:22

one of the few animals with their

03:23

testies locked inside next to their

03:25

kidneys honestly for the best elephants

03:28

also have a Fingal pouch behind the

03:30

tongue pretty much an emergency 4 L life

03:32

flas to hold him over during a bad

03:33

drought I didn't even know that they

03:35

have feet that actually will get to that

03:38

they have modified teeth that are

03:39

arguably the biggest Flex in the animal

03:41

kingdom but probably too big cuz it's

03:43

also gotten them violated by po to the

03:44

point where evolution is starting to

03:46

backpedal on tusks also elephants have

03:48

big personalities to be fair they are

03:51

mammals and mammals with mamories are

03:52

nothing special but that trunk is it

03:55

might just be the second most OP body

03:57

part in nature with the first being

03:58

thumbs an elephant's trunk has 40,000

04:01

muscles that's about 40,000 reasons to

04:03

stay out of their hit box they also have

04:05

400,000 nerves controlling it that means

04:08

the same trunk that can deadlift two

04:09

prime Shacks at 700 lb is also delicate

04:12

enough to pluck a blade of grass and

04:14

that's cuz the tip of the trunk has

04:15

prehensile grip that's not the only

04:17

thing that's prehensile but I digress

04:18

it's kind of like fingers that African

04:20

elephants have two of and Asians only

04:22

one and it allows a full-time qual head

04:24

to pick stuff up they're also one of the

04:25

very few animals able to throw and the

04:27

day they develop Aimbot humanity is

04:29

cooked there's plenty of other uses for

04:31

the trunks some of them even social it's

04:32

so complicated that not only does it

04:34

take a year or two for babies to figure

04:35

them all out baby elephants even have an

04:37

awkward phase where they literally don't

04:39

know what to do with it it's actually

04:40

why you'll see them helicopter it around

04:42

there's a joke in there somewhere I'm

04:43

not going to make it I'm sure the

04:44

comments will but just know we're not

04:45

that different and if you follow a young

04:47

elephant long enough you'll even see it

04:48

step on its own trunk it takes time for

04:50

them to get all the controls down but

04:51

until they do its best use is as a

04:54

pacifier but it takes more than looking

04:55

like Nature's science project for me to

04:57

confidently call you the weirdest animal

04:58

on the planet you better be packing some

05:00

pretty impressive abilities too and let

05:02

it be known no animal packs more than an

05:04

elephant first super strength elephants

05:07

are more than capable of humbling an

05:08

entire tree if the end game's extra

05:10

calories plus being the biggest thing

05:11

with life and legs on a planet means

05:13

this is what happens when second and

05:14

third forget their place and at Battle

05:16

Royale featuring every land animal ain't

05:18

nothing touching a motivated Bale

05:20

elephant elephants also have the best

05:22

smell of the animal kingdom strong

05:24

enough to threaten a blood Hound's job

05:25

security they can sniff out a watering

05:27

hole over 10 Mi away and they don't just

05:29

smell where or what food but elephants

05:31

can smell how much food in experiments

05:33

elephants were able to consistently

05:35

Sniff and pick the container with the

05:36

most sunflower seeds without even

05:38

eyeballing it a test even dogs failed

05:40

elephants are also way better swimmers

05:42

than they have any business being most

05:44

mammals can swim but bigger ones like

05:46

rhinos and giraffes are pretty poor and

05:48

despite gatekeeping watering holes and

05:49

being a literal land whale hippos

05:51

technically can't swim at all elephants

05:53

can't relate they can swim for hours and

05:55

cover miles searching for food there's

05:57

even a theory that Munchies made Modern

05:58

Day mastadons swim from India to the

06:00

nearby island of Sri Lanka to put in

06:02

perspective there's at least one shark

06:04

on the planet aware of the existence of

06:05

elephants that's kind of crazy to think

06:07

about elephants also have infrasonic

06:09

hearing and can communicate through low

06:11

frequency vibrations they're too low for

06:13

any of us to hear but the sound can

06:14

travel for miles and the pads pick up

06:16

the longdistance calls through their

06:18

feet you see I told you we'd get back to

06:19

that thanks to a fatty spongy like

06:21

cushion also you're seeing that right

06:23

elephants do have built-in high heels

06:25

that's why there are stories of

06:26

elephants saving people from tsunamis

06:28

before they even happen even have

06:30

different infra calls with different

06:31

meanings cuz of course they do you got a

06:34

greeting Rumble used when a family

06:35

member gone for hours suddenly returns a

06:37

rumble The Matriarch uses to get the

06:39

herd moving and even a congratulation

06:41

Rumble for when an elephant in the group

06:42

gets laid that's a Snapple fact for you

06:45

not to be confused with the Symphony of

06:47

an elephant baby shower in fact those

06:48

calls are often how they end up with a

06:50

baby see the problem with spending

06:51

nearly 2 years pregnant in another 10

06:53

raising a cap that comes out is dating's

06:55

a different kind of drought a mother

06:57

elephant might be open for business once

06:59

every 5 years so once that window does

07:01

open she makes the elephant equivalent

07:03

of a Facebook event by broadcasting a

07:04

booty call to every eligible bachelor in

07:07

the area it's like a Batman symbol for

07:09

down bad bulls and before long she's

07:10

attracted more testosterone than the

07:12

State of Florida during spring break and

07:13

like a 13,000 lb frat boy drunk off lust

07:16

violence is the only option where the

07:18

winner gets to pass on his jeans while

07:20

the loser makes sure he's not the only

07:21

one that's sore now the next superpow is

07:24

no surprise because you've definitely

07:25

heard the phrase an elephant never

07:27

forgets depending on the contest text

07:29

that's either a throwaway fact or a very

07:31

real threat but elephants do have steel

07:33

trap memory and it's because their life

07:35

literally depends on it as an elephant

07:37

the most important resource in your life

07:40

is water and during the dry season that

07:42

can mean walking hundreds of miles to

07:43

the next Watering Hole imagine living in

07:45

an area the size of New York with only

07:47

five water fountains and no Google Maps

07:49

to bail you out all you have is your

07:51

memory that's why elephant herds are led

07:53

by a matriarch who uses her years of

07:55

experience to not only bring her family

07:56

to water but to the right watering hole

07:58

at the right time of year get it wrong

08:00

and the whole herd becomes the beginning

08:01

of a Disney movie instead you got big

08:03

mama carrying the entire family off a

08:05

brain that runs like a supercomputer

08:07

able to pull memories older than some of

08:08

the members of The Herd when she needs

08:10

it so as you can see elephants don't

08:12

just have one of the freakiest builds in

08:13

nature but one of the craziest skill

08:15

sets too it's how the largest land lber

08:17

on the planet can survive and thrive on

08:19

the Savannah in dense tropical jungles

08:22

desolate hellscape and sunbaked deserts

08:25

and even inside dark caves to mine salt

08:27

elephants beast spunking but all those

08:29

abilities wouldn't mean as much without

08:31

the most busted ability of all their

08:33

intelligence elephants aren't smart dogs

08:35

and cats are smart now elephants

08:37

elephants are prodigies in my admittedly

08:40

biased opinion they're the smartest

08:41

thing on the planet that isn't a human

08:43

and sometimes they give us a run for the

08:44

title they might not be putting

08:45

elephants on the moon or breaking down

08:47

quantum physics or watching Rick and

08:49

Morty but elephants do one up humans

08:51

every so often some Asian elephants have

08:53

memorized the schedules of trucks

08:54

carrying sugar cane and Will Wait posted

08:56

on the side of the road just to hold up

08:58

the truck to help themselves to the

08:59

Harvest they even figured out how to

09:01

take just enough to satisfy themselves

09:03

but not so much that they forc the

09:04

drivers to do something about it it's

09:06

basically an elephant and force toll but

09:08

okay you're not impressed I got you

09:09

elephants raing crops have led some

09:11

Farmers to protect their product using

09:12

an electric fence clearly they weren't

09:14

familiar with their game because those

09:16

same elephants eventually learn how to

09:17

disarm defenses without getting hurt and

09:19

that's the thing with its memory it

09:20

really only takes one experience for an

09:22

elephant to learn from to have that

09:23

knowledge for the rest of his life and

09:25

pass it off to others and a prime

09:27

example of that are the elephants of

09:28

ambeli now naal Park in Kenya where

09:30

they've learned to tell the difference

09:32

between the language of the Messi tribes

09:33

that historically hunted them and the

09:35

dialect of other tribes that they don't

09:36

have beef with those elephants even have

09:38

a stronger reaction to the voices of men

09:40

versus women and children since at one

09:42

point they caught on that men were more

09:43

of a threat but okay maybe an elephant

09:46

understanding human doesn't impress you

09:48

what about one that speaks it koshik the

09:50

elephant shocked the world when he

09:51

started imitating his Korean caraker

09:53

with pretty Eerie

09:58

accuracy

10:06

y elephants are also on the VIP list of

10:09

animals self-aware enough to recognize

10:10

their reflection and pass the mirror

10:12

test they also pass another awareness

10:14

test that might just be more impressive

10:16

so the University of Cambridge did an

10:17

experiment where they had elephants pass

10:19

a stick to a researcher except the stick

10:21

would be attached to a mat that the

10:22

elephants would be standing on so the

10:24

elephants would have to have the self

10:25

awareness to realize they needed to step

10:27

off the mat to pass the stick and of

10:28

course they had a control group where

10:30

everything was the same except the stick

10:31

wasn't attached well 42 times out of 48

10:34

the elephant stepped off the mat before

10:36

passing the stick compared to just three

10:38

when it wasn't attached and maybe that's

10:39

not a big deal and I'm just being a big

10:41

nerd about it but that's arguably more

10:42

impressive than being able to peep

10:43

yourself in the mirror but that's just

10:44

me I didn't even mention pregnant

10:46

elephants apparently self-medicating

10:48

with the plant Boren seed in order to

10:50

induce labor which some women in the

10:51

same area apparently drink as t for the

10:54

same reason there's different ways of

10:55

being smart but it's a tus jockey's

10:57

emotional intelligence that really sets

10:59

him up apart you've probably seen the

11:00

videos of elephant herds seeming to

11:02

mourn the dead after coming across the

11:03

bones of a relative and considering

11:05

their almost unnatural sense of smell

11:07

there's a good chance they knew exactly

11:09

who that was and it's not just other

11:10

elephants they grieve Lawrence Anthony

11:12

was a conservationist who saved a herd

11:14

of elephants from certain death after

11:16

they escaped the reserve and were about

11:17

to be shot and Anthony somehow

11:18

communicated with the matriarch enough

11:20

to bring them back earning him the

11:22

nickname The Elephant Whisperer he would

11:24

die suddenly in 2011 and in the days

11:26

after the same elephants he had rescued

11:29

showed up to his house and seemed to

11:30

hold a 2-day vigil Not only was this

11:33

after not visiting for more than a year

11:34

some of the elephants traveled well over

11:36

12 hours for their funeral and

11:38

apparently they would return the next

11:39

several years on the exact date of his

11:41

death to pay their respects but that

11:42

leaves just one question how how did

11:45

they know maybe one of the elephants saw

11:47

or smelt something off and sent an

11:49

infrasonic message to the others maybe

11:50

the emergency vehicles on the property

11:52

somehow got their attention we don't

11:54

know for sure and we probably never will

11:56

mourning the dead is just a surface of

11:58

elephant EMP empathy cuz elephants are

12:00

the textbook example of animal altruism

12:02

elephants will adopt non-related orphans

12:05

into the group so long that it doesn't

12:06

put their own Young At Risk bundle up

12:08

was an elephant in a theme park who

12:10

figured out how to get out of her

12:11

shackles and immediately freed the

12:12

others despite the fact that they likely

12:14

were in her immediate family and the

12:16

fact that doing so made it more likely

12:17

she'd get caught that same altruism

12:19

doesn't just apply to their own kind

12:21

there have been stories of these massive

12:22

beasts seemingly protecting sleeping or