Bill Schnee: Engineering Steely Dan's Aja

Rick Beato 2
19 Mar 202498:46

Summary

TLDRIn this engaging interview, sound engineer Bill Schne shares his experiences working with music legends such as Ringo Starr and the band Steely Dan. He discusses the evolution of recording studios, the art of capturing perfect sounds, and his philosophy on using minimal equipment for maximum results. Schne's anecdotes offer a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of some of the most iconic music of our time.

Takeaways

  • 🎶 Bill Schnee, a renowned figure in the music industry, shares his experiences working with significant artists including Ringo Starr and Steely Dan in his book 'Chairman at the Board'.
  • 🎤 Schnee's career began in high school when he moved to Los Angeles and started playing keyboard in a band, leading to his first recording studio experience at Capitol Records in 1964.
  • 🎧 The evolution of recording studios, such as Capitol Records, is discussed, highlighting the changes in equipment and room acoustics over the years.
  • 🎷 Bill Schnee's 'Aha moment' in his career was when he realized the emotional impact of recording techniques while working with Richie Poler, which set the course for his future in the industry.
  • 🎹 Schnee's approach to recording drums, known as the 'Bill Schnee drum sound', involved miking all drums and focusing on capturing a full, impactful sound without excessive EQ.
  • 🎶 The Phil Spector 'wall of sound' technique is explained, characterized by large rhythm sections and a full, immersive sound in the 60s.
  • 🎵 Schnee's work with Ringo Starr's album 'Photograph' is highlighted, where he utilized the talents of George Harrison and Richard Perry to enhance the recording.
  • 🎶 The importance of headphone mixes for musicians was emphasized by Schnee, sharing his early struggles and the lessons he learned that influenced his later engineering practices.
  • 🎤 The transition from four-track to eight-track recording was a significant shift, changing how drums and other instruments were recorded and mixed.
  • 🎚️ The use of compression in recording, especially on drums, evolved over time and became a defining characteristic of different music eras and styles.

Q & A

  • What was Bill Schnee's first experience in a recording studio like?

    -Bill Schnee's first experience in a recording studio was when he was around 16 or 17 years old. He was scared and had difficulty singing with headphones, which was a new experience for him. This led to his realization about the importance of headphone mix and balance for musicians.

  • How did Bill Schnee get his start in the audio industry?

    -Bill Schnee got his start in the audio industry after his family moved to Los Angeles for his senior year of high school. He joined a band and they recorded a demo at a small studio. A parent of one of the band members knew someone in the music business, Gary Usher, who liked their demo and got them a production deal with Decca Records.

  • What was the significance of Richie Poler in Bill Schnee's career?

    -Richie Poler was a significant figure in Bill Schnee's career as he was the one who recognized Schnee's potential and gave him the opportunity to work in his studio. Poler's studio was known for being one of the hottest rock studios in Los Angeles, and Schnee's work there marked a major step in his career as a recording engineer.

  • What was the 'Aha moment' for Bill Schnee in his career?

    -Bill Schnee's 'Aha moment' was when he was working with Richie Poler and heard a playback of a recording that had an extra quality to it. He realized that it was something special that Poler was doing in the recording process, which inspired him to ask Poler to teach him how to do it. This moment set the course for the rest of his life in the audio industry.

  • How did the transition from four-track to eight-track recording change the process?

    -The transition from four-track to eight-track recording was a significant change as it allowed for more separation and complexity in the recording process. It meant that each instrument or group of instruments could be recorded on separate tracks, allowing for greater control and flexibility during mixing. This change required a new way of thinking about arrangement and overdubbing.

  • What was the typical setup for recording drums in the 1960s?

    -In the 1960s, the typical setup for recording drums would include an overhead microphone, a snare microphone, a kick drum microphone, and sometimes additional mics for toms, depending on the desired sound. The setup was often focused on capturing a mono sound rather than a stereo image, with the aim of achieving a good balance across all the drums.

  • How did Bill Schnee approach the use of compression in his work?

    -Bill Schnee approached the use of compression with a minimalistic philosophy. He believed in using compression minimally for leveling purposes rather than for shaping the sound significantly. This approach was influenced by his early experiences and his preference for capturing the natural sound of the instruments.

  • What was the significance of the Phil Spector 'wall of sound' in the recording of 'Photograph'?

    -The Phil Spector 'wall of sound' was significant in the recording of 'Photograph' as it involved creating a dense, immersive sound by using multiple instruments and voices to create a rich sonic texture. This approach was adapted for the song to give it a fuller, more dynamic sound compared to the original, more mournful version.

  • What was the role of isolation booths in the recording process?

    -Isolation booths played a crucial role in the recording process by allowing for the separation of individual instruments and voices. This separation helped to prevent sound leakage between different microphones and instruments, enabling a cleaner, more controlled mix.

  • How did the introduction of multi-track recording change the dynamics of recording sessions?

    -The introduction of multi-track recording changed the dynamics of recording sessions by allowing for greater control and flexibility. It enabled musicians to record their parts separately, which could then be mixed together to create a final track. This approach reduced the need for everyone to play together at the same time and allowed for more intricate arrangements and overdubbing.

Outlines

00:00

🎤 Introduction and Background

The paragraph introduces Bill Schnee, a guest on the show, who is a renowned figure in the music industry with a book titled 'Chairman at the Board'. The host expresses admiration for Bill's work and mentions an interesting pattern of interviewing individuals associated with the song 'Asia'. Bill's journey in the music industry began in Los Angeles during his senior year of high school, where he joined a band and later got involved in recording sessions. His first experience in a recording studio was at Capitol Records in 1964, which marked the beginning of his illustrious career.

05:01

🎧 Evolution of Recording Studios

Bill Schnee discusses the evolution of recording studios over the years, particularly Capitol Records, which underwent significant changes from the late 80s to the 90s. He talks about the technical advancements and the impact on the sound quality. Bill shares his experiences working in different studios, including his time at Richie Poler's studio, where he learned valuable lessons about recording and production. He also touches on the importance of headphone mixes for musicians during recording sessions.

10:02

🎼 Aha Moment and Studio Experiences

Bill shares his 'Aha' moment in the recording studio, which was a pivotal point in his career. He describes the experience of working with Richie Poler and how it shaped his understanding of recording techniques. Bill also talks about his move to Hollywood and his early days of working in a small studio, which eventually led to him engineering in some of the best studios in Los Angeles.

15:03

🎹 Learning the Craft and Studio Stories

In this paragraph, Bill delves into his experiences learning the craft of recording and mixing. He talks about the importance of experience and learning from the masters. Bill shares anecdotes about working with different artists and producers, including his time at Sunset Sound and his work with Ringo Starr on his 1973 album. He also discusses the influence of Phil Spector's 'wall of sound' and how it was adapted for the song 'Photograph'.

20:06

🎤 Drum Sound and Recording Techniques

Bill Schnee talks about his approach to recording drums, which became known as the 'Bill Schnee drum sound'. He discusses the evolution of his technique, influenced by British records and his desire for a more full-range sound. Bill shares his experiences with different microphones and the challenges of capturing the right drum sound. He also talks about his work with Steely Dan, including the unique approach to recording and the band's professional approach to making music.

25:08

🎧 Studio Design and Sound Quality

Bill discusses the importance of studio design and sound quality in recording. He talks about his dissatisfaction with the SSL consoles and the impact of automation systems on the mixing process. Bill shares his philosophy on obtaining the purest sound and his preference for simple, well-implemented audio equipment. He also mentions his experiences with different types of microphones and preamps, emphasizing the importance of getting a colorless sound that can be shaped later in the mix.

30:15

🎼 Reflections on a Legendary Career

In the final paragraph, Bill reflects on his legendary career in the music industry. He talks about the unique qualities of Steely Dan's music and the band's songwriting style. Bill also discusses the evolution of recording techniques, the importance of great musicianship, and the shift in the role of musicians from the 60s to the 80s. He shares his thoughts on the best microphones and equipment for recording, emphasizing his preference for tube equipment and the pursuit of a pure, uncolored sound.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Audio Engineering

Audio engineering refers to the creative and technical process of recording, mixing, and producing sound, especially in music and live performances. In the video, the guest Bill Schnee shares his experiences and insights into the audio engineering field, discussing various aspects such as recording techniques, equipment, and his work with notable musicians and bands like Steely Dan and Ringo Starr.

💡Recording Studios

Recording studios are specialized facilities designed for recording, mixing, and mastering audio content, typically for music production. In the context of the video, Bill Schnee discusses his experiences working in various recording studios, including Capitol Records and his own studio, highlighting the evolution of studio design and technology over the years.

💡Music Production

Music production encompasses the entire process of creating and arranging music, including composing, recording, mixing, and mastering. In the video, Bill Schnee's book 'Chairman at the Board' likely covers his extensive career in music production, sharing stories of working with famous artists and the technical aspects of producing hit records.

💡Drums

Drums are a percussion instrument that provides rhythm and timekeeping in music. In the video, the discussion of drum recording, especially Steve Gadd's performance on 'Asia,' highlights the importance of drums in music production and the technical aspects of capturing their sound in a recording studio.

💡Microphones

Microphones are devices used to convert sound into an electrical signal for recording or amplification. In the video, Schnee discusses various microphone types and their applications in recording studios, emphasizing the importance of selecting the right microphone for different instruments and voices.

💡Mixing

Mixing is the process of combining multiple audio tracks into a final mono, stereo, or surround sound product. In the video, Bill Schnee's expertise in mixing is evident as he shares stories of his work on various albums and the technical and creative decisions involved in achieving a balanced and polished sound.

💡Headphones

Headphones are personal audio devices that allow individuals to listen to music or other audio content privately. In the context of the video, headphones play a crucial role in recording studios for monitoring sound, as Schnee discusses the challenges he faced with headphone mixes early in his career and their importance in achieving a balanced recording.

💡SSL Consoles

SSL consoles are a series of mixing consoles produced by Solid State Logic, widely used in professional recording studios for their high-quality sound and advanced features. In the video, Bill Schnee expresses his initial dislike for SSL consoles, particularly their automation system, before adapting to them as technology evolved.

💡Studio Design

Studio design refers to the architectural and acoustic planning of recording studios to achieve optimal sound quality. In the video, Bill Schnee's emphasis on the importance of room sound and his deliberate choice to build a studio with a great room sound illustrates the critical role of studio design in audio recording.

💡Musical Arrangements

Musical arrangements involve the organization and structure of musical elements, such as melody, harmony, and rhythm, to create a cohesive piece of music. In the video, Bill Schnee mentions the detailed charts for songs like 'Asia,' highlighting the importance of arrangements in achieving a complex and polished musical performance.

💡Record Deals

A record deal is a contract between a recording artist and a record label, which typically involves the production, distribution, and promotion of music recordings. In the video, Bill Schnee's account of signing a record deal with Decca Records through Gary Usher illustrates the process of breaking into the music industry and the role of record deals in an artist's career.

Highlights

Bill Schnee's experience in the recording studio began in 1964 with his first band, where he played keyboard and contributed to songwriting.

Schnee's first encounter with professional recording was at Capitol Records, where he faced challenges adjusting to using headphones for the first time.

Schnee shares his 'aha moment' in the studio, realizing the impact of recording techniques and arrangements after hearing his band's playback for the first time.

Schnee discusses the evolution of recording studios, such as Capitol Records, which underwent significant changes in the late 80s and early 90s, including rebuilding their main studio room.

The importance of headphone mixes in recording is emphasized by Schnee, who shares his early struggles and the lessons he learned that influenced his later work with other engineers.

Schnee's career took a pivotal turn when he began working at a small studio in Hollywood, learning from other engineers and eventually moving to a larger, more renowned studio.

Schnee's work with Richie Poler's studio led to his first experience recording major artists like Three Dog Night, which was a significant step in his engineering career.

The transition from four-track recording to eight-track recording is discussed, highlighting the changes in how music was produced and the new challenges it presented.

Schnee reflects on the influence of Phil Spector's 'wall of sound' and how it inspired the production techniques used on Ringo Starr's hit record, which Schnee worked on.

The importance of experience in understanding how much high-end is needed during the recording process is emphasized, as there is no way to undo changes like in modern digital recording.

Schnee shares his admiration for the Beatles and their innovative use of compression, especially in songs like 'Tomorrow Never Knows'.

The transition from SSL consoles to modern mixing platforms like Pro Tools is discussed, with Schnee sharing his initial reluctance and eventual adaptation to new technology.

Schnee's approach to recording drums, including his unique 'Bill Schnee drum sound,' is discussed, highlighting his preference for miking all drums and avoiding excessive EQ.

The impact of multi-track recording on the music industry and the shift from capturing ensemble performances to focusing on individual instrument isolation is discussed.

Schnee shares his experiences working with Steely Dan, emphasizing the professional and efficient nature of their recording sessions.

The story behind the recording of the hit song 'You Make Me Feel Like Dancing' by Leo Sayer, which was recorded on the same day as an Asia session, is shared by Schnee.

Transcripts

00:00

hey everybody my guest today is Bill

00:02

schne now normally I do an intro about

00:06

them but I'm actually going to talk to

00:08

Bill he has a book called chairman at

00:11

the board that's right here and I'm a

00:15

huge fan of his and I kind of had this

00:17

recurring thing where anyone that was

00:19

associated with the song Asia now he

00:22

worked on the entire Cel danan Asia

00:24

record but anybody that played on the on

00:28

Asia I have to or that was in the studio

00:31

at the time I have to interview and so

00:33

this is going to be a part of this but

00:36

I'm going to ask Bill questions about

00:39

this but his book he talks about this

00:41

and many of the other recording sessions

00:44

that he's been on including this Ringo

00:46

Star record that's has all Ringo's

00:49

biggest hits on it and is a record that

00:52

I go back and listen to all the time

00:54

Bill welcome first of all great to be

00:56

here with you let's start with some

00:58

specific things okay let's talk about

01:00

your background you have your book out

01:03

where you talk about these things but

01:04

you're 70 six almost seven you're born

01:07

in 47 right correct so when did you

01:10

first get interested in the audio part

01:13

of music and the when's the first time

01:15

you walked into a recording studio let's

01:17

start there okay my parents moved to Los

01:20

Angeles for my senior year of high

01:22

school and I met some guys that were

01:24

starting a band and keyboard was my main

01:27

instrument and I I I said what if what

01:31

do you think about an organ in there and

01:32

they said sure let's try it so we did it

01:35

and uh in instead of buying the Vox

01:38

Continental back in 1964 which would

01:41

have made more sense uh my mom had the

01:44

the Hammond M self-contained which she

01:48

allowed me to cut saw it off so that I

01:50

could take the top and put it in my

01:51

dad's trunks instead of buying a B3 and

01:54

having to have a van we started writing

01:55

songs that we thought were pretty good

01:57

we went to a little demo Studio little

02:00

cheap Studio out where we lived and put

02:02

a several down and uh one of the parents

02:05

of of the band knew someone who knew

02:07

someone that was in the music business

02:10

and we uh sent the tape off to that

02:13

person that person was Gary Usher who

02:15

was good friends uh lived near the beach

02:17

boy Wilson family and actually wanted to

02:19

be a beach boy um and even though he

02:24

didn't make it he did write two of

02:26

Brian's big hits in my room in

02:28

409 and um

02:30

he thought we were pretty good so he uh

02:32

he just made a deal for with Deca

02:34

records a production deal and he signed

02:37

us to a contract so the F the first time

02:41

I went in a real Studio would be then

02:43

Capital Records in uh late

02:46

1964 okay so Capital Records in

02:49

1964 how did it change really over the

02:52

years is there some of the same gear

02:54

everything changed they they rebuilt I

02:56

can't remember when late late 80s I

02:58

think around '90s they redid their their

03:01

big room their Studio A was a gorgeous

03:04

sounding room uh but it had a control

03:07

room you know that could not handle even

03:09

a multirack tape recorder it was so

03:11

small so they rebuilt everything there

03:14

and redid the room didn't necessarily

03:16

make it better sounding but it made it

03:17

more versatile whatever and they also

03:20

broke the wall between uh the two

03:22

Studios with uh and they did that really

03:25

right so you you had complete isolation

03:28

from the two Studios if you needed it or

03:30

you could open it up which I had done

03:32

many times and put like strings and

03:34

flutes in B and the Rhythm Section with

03:36

horns in a anyway uh Studio B they

03:39

didn't change as much it has a littleit

03:42

but they're they're both basically quite

03:44

different than they were then I recorded

03:46

in studio a one time probably 2005 and

03:50

with an orchestra I don't have any

03:52

pictures from it I remember that the

03:53

control room I may be totally off it was

03:56

kind of an odd shape yeah the new

03:58

control room is little bit odd sh kind

04:00

of an odd shape right but the tracking

04:02

room is beautiful there that's the first

04:05

time you went in what did you think when

04:06

you go into a recording studio the first

04:08

time well I'm 16 years old so I'm or 17

04:11

by then I guess I'm I'm scared to death

04:13

that's what I thought I'm petrified you

04:16

know and and my first experience you

04:20

know with headphones and you know

04:22

because you know a band we all played

04:25

heard each other acoustically now we

04:26

have these headphones and uh for vocals

04:30

they set us up so that we did play

04:31

acoustically and he each other but I I

04:33

could not sing with those headphones I

04:35

mean it was a nightmare so that later in

04:37

life when I started uh when I had my own

04:40

studio and I'm training second Engineers

04:43

uh they they were they were told very

04:46

much so about watching that uh headphone

04:49

mix and explain to them because you know

04:51

you can't play what you can't hear you

04:52

know you have to hear the other

04:54

musicians and it has to be a good

04:55

balance and on and on and on I I want to

04:58

come back eventually to headphone mixes

05:00

because this is I've never actually

05:02

talked about that with any of the

05:04

engineers that I've ever interviewed but

05:06

it's incredibly important thing go but

05:09

what kind of headphones would they use

05:11

back then I don't I couldn't tell you

05:13

okay but they there were nothing even

05:15

even for the time you know Studio

05:17

headphones have always been uh a they're

05:20

not like the best headphones you can buy

05:23

because they can't take the kind of

05:24

level or whatever that you know is

05:26

required for the musicians so but I

05:29

don't remember anything about them just

05:30

remember hating them uh but that was but

05:34

that was the the first time uh that I

05:36

was in a studio and Gary Usher brought

05:39

in a guitar player to augment the band

05:41

our our guitar player was not maybe the

05:43

greatest and he he had figured that out

05:46

so he brought in this guy Richie poder

05:48

you know who that is ah

05:50

Richie Richie was a phenomenal musician

05:54

uh he just passed away last year he was

05:56

a phenomenal musician turns out he was

05:57

also as I later learned a phenomenal

05:59

engineer and producer and so when when

06:04

when we got dropped because we didn't

06:06

have a hit um we uh I went over to his

06:10

studio and told him the sad story and he

06:12

said oh you guys were great I can get

06:14

you a record deal go see this guy Mike

06:16

cerb he's going to go places and he had

06:18

been working with Mike cerb on these

06:19

Beach Blanket Bingo movies these that

06:22

were going on so I went to Mike Curb and

06:25

he signed us to another singles deal and

06:29

uh we went into Richie's studio and his

06:32

Studio was kind of funky compared to

06:34

Capital way also uh we did I did one or

06:37

I'm a huge I was and still am a huge

06:39

beach boy fan and um we when we got done

06:44

there was one song that needed an organ

06:46

solo and he Gary took us to Western

06:50

Studio 3 which is where Brian lived and

06:52

did and talk several times in my my life

06:56

my career where I've been nervous as

06:57

hell here I'm in that Studio on the

07:00

organ that had been used on some of

07:02

their records and I'm freaking out but

07:04

but anyway going from Western and

07:06

capital to the best Studios both then

07:08

and now if Capital were

07:11

reopen um you know it's closed right now

07:14

yeah yeah yeah yeah so um I but we went

07:17

into poder studio and he spent he spent

07:21

a lot more time on the arrangement with

07:22

us than Gary Usher had done but when he

07:25

got it where he thought it was good he

07:26

had us put down a take and I came into

07:28

the control room room and I remember

07:30

this like it was yesterday uh and he hit

07:34

play and I looked up at the 604s and

07:37

utility cabinets as the sound was coming

07:40

out and I felt something emotionally

07:43

that I had never felt in those other

07:44

Studios there was something extra to the

07:47

band and I knew it had to be what he was

07:49

doing in the recording so that's what

07:52

I've called my aha moment so much so

07:54

that when it was done I turned to him

07:56

and pointed at all the equipment and

07:58

said can you teach me how to do this and

07:59

he said no I'm teaching this guy Cooper

08:01

go on out and do another take but that

08:03

was the moment when the basically set

08:06

the rest of my life In Motion how did

08:08

you get into working at Studios then

08:11

well my parents lived outside of Los

08:14

Angeles and uh funny enough uh a studio

08:17

opened up in the town where we lived it

08:21

wasn't much of a studio it was it was

08:23

just a two track machine egg cartons on

08:26

the wall uh he had two ensor mics okay

08:31

uh and uh I you know like a lot of

08:34

people uh maybe before me but certainly

08:37

after me uh if you let me uh clean the

08:40

bathrooms and whatever you need done if

08:42

you'll teach me how to do this the

08:45

fortunate part is it was only stereo so

08:48

everything we did was live you had to

08:50

mix it live unfortunately W very many

08:54

none very many good artists you know and

08:57

musicians but uh it got me into doing it

09:01

doing it live and um within six months

09:06

the owner had me doing all the sessions

09:08

because I was better than he was which

09:10

might not be saying much but and then uh

09:13

about 6 months eight months after that

09:15

he comes in one day and says we're

09:17

moving to Hollywood and I said what are

09:19

you talking about he said I found an

09:21

empty studio for rent and we're moving

09:23

to Hollywood I said I'm not ready to go

09:24

to Hollywood Oh no you're ready you're

09:26

ready and to show you what this guy was

09:29

like um on the console he had gotten

09:33

those old engraved plaques you know

09:35

several layers where they cut through

09:36

the first layer and it was he had me

09:38

join AES and he put Bill schne AES in on

09:42

the producers thing to and so we're

09:45

moving to Hollywood and I had to move

09:46

the I I scraped that off and threw it

09:48

away before we before we got to

09:50

Hollywood but we moved everything to

09:52

Hollywood

09:53

and um and it was there that uh Richie

09:58

polers had an engineer that worked for

10:00

him uh and I would go visit Richie

10:02

wouldn't let me come and visit sessions

10:04

uh but that he was doing which at the

10:06

time were Stephen wolf and three dog

10:08

knight uh engineering those he would go

10:10

on to produce them the Lion Share of uh

10:14

both of their careers along with a lot

10:15

of other great Rock Records um but his

10:19

other engineer in the studio came over

10:22

and uh started listening to what I was

10:24

doing he said you know you're really

10:25

good and I yeah I know I didn't believe

10:29

it for a second about a year and a half

10:31

later he decided to quit the business

10:33

this guy and uh I I said do you think

10:36

Richie would hire me and he said well I

10:38

don't know but he should and so he told

10:40

Richie about me and I started begging

10:42

and here and what's amazing is by then

10:45

he had the hottest Rock Studio

10:47

independent studio in Los Angeles and uh

10:50

it was less than three years from when I

10:52

was in there for that first playback

10:53

where I literally didn't know the

10:55

difference between an equalizer and a

10:57

limiter and now I'm asking to engineer

10:59

his studio and uh after two months of

11:03

begging he finally let me try a demo

11:05

session and it worked and so I said see

11:10

I know I can do this and he said oh here

11:12

here's another demo session okay I did

11:14

it they liked me and then okay what now

11:17

and he said well come on tomorrow night

11:18

and record Three Dog

11:20

Night okay and this is excuse me what

11:24

you'd call being thrown in the deep end

11:25

of the pool and uh so there another time

11:30

when I was petrified but boy the

11:32

producer at the time uh was nice to me

11:35

and the band was nice to me and I cut a

11:37

track and it went well and next day

11:39

Richie said what do I do now Richie said

11:42

come on and third night another one and

11:46

uh uh on that third night I got in

11:49

trouble uh Richie is as I mentioned a

11:51

phenomenal guitar player and the guitar

11:53

player wanted an effect that I had no

11:56

idea how to get and so I had to call

11:58

Richie and he and bill came down and

12:00

took over and that was the end of my

12:02

tracking I did more overdubs and I hung

12:04

out as much as I could what was the

12:06

effect bill I don't

12:08

remember I don't remember and I don't

12:11

maybe he was making it up yeah it was

12:13

almost for sure I'm sure but you know

12:15

like I said Richie would know I mean he

12:17

hit this was their second album they

12:19

already had a hit and they were on their

12:20

way to being one of the biggest bands in

12:22

the 70 early 70s and uh and he had you

12:26

know he had engineered the the first Al

12:29

and I asked him you know I asked him

12:31

years later because that was my

12:34

springboard and I asked him years later

12:36

why in the world would you turn over

12:38

your biggest client Gabriel meckler who

12:41

was producing Stephan wilfin Three Dog

12:42

Night to a snot-nose kid if I had fallen

12:45

on my face he could have really gotten

12:47

pissed off that you wasted an evening

12:49

with and and let let alone after I did

12:52

the first night and the second night

12:53

you're letting me go on you know it it

12:56

doesn't make any sense and he he didn't

12:58

have any answer

12:59

10 years later about 20 years after that

13:02

I asked him again come on you got to

13:04

have some way up and he said the only

13:06

thing I can think of is I wanted the

13:07

band to see how important I was to you

13:10

know that I was really behind the the

13:12

records which he was and uh which still

13:15

doesn't explain why he let me continue

13:17

to record but since I fell on my face he

13:20

got back in the chair and took over and

13:22

all is well that ends so what kind of

13:24

consoles did they have like at this

13:27

studio for example you know if in the '

13:29

60s the uh everybody built their own

13:32

consoles there were no console

13:33

manufacturers per se so you know Capital

13:37

built their RCA built their so on and so

13:39

forth uh Richie Richie Studio had a

13:42

homemade console uh it was transistor it

13:45

was one of the early transistor consoles

13:48

and uh and it definitely for the time

13:51

especially you know it had a sound okay

13:54

and it would be how many Channel console

13:56

would it be I think i' I have a picture

13:58

of it I think it was 12 inputs okay 12

14:01

rotary pots and you'd be recording on a

14:03

four track four track at the time it

14:05

started for track when you're recording

14:07

on a four track are you doing bounces at

14:11

this point yeah when would you do your

14:13

first bounce you do the basic tracks and

14:15

then what you do you start doing bounces

14:17

right after that not always right after

14:19

it typically the Rhythm Section would be

14:23

one track right away okay and then you

14:26

might start doing some kind of uh

14:28

instrumental overdubs on another track

14:31

and maybe even and and for sure a vocal

14:33

to to get even a rough one whatnot and

14:36

then depending on how much you needed

14:37

that's when the bounces would start when

14:39

you start bouncing stuff like that

14:41

working in these early like four tracks

14:44

how do you know how much high-end

14:46

something's going to need after the

14:48

third bounce or whatever do you have to

14:50

actually crank up the high-end on

14:53

something would you add high-end to

14:54

things or these are really you would

14:56

right how would you know how much to do

14:58

when cuz you're basically premixing and

15:00

you're you can't really get back it's

15:02

not like undo with pro tools or anything

15:05

you put a phrase in there the answer is

15:08

experience so when you're a beginning

15:10

engineer you don't know you're going to

15:12

learn by doing yeah yeah that's exactly

15:15

what I had to do and see the the great

15:17

thing for me was I I've been playing

15:20

music One Way or Another since grade

15:22

school and but all my aptitude was in

15:24

math and science so much so that when I

15:28

uh when I started

15:29

College I I only I started college in

15:32

Aerospace that's what I thought I would

15:34

do uh we got signed right away so uh I

15:37

after the first semester I quit school

15:40

uh my dad was a Jewish doctor you know

15:42

what that means no dad I don't want to

15:44

be a doctor but then a

15:47

lawyer uh later I in fact would start

15:50

start law school just to shut him up but

15:53

but I quit I quit and chased the band

15:55

for two and a half years uh so uh but

15:59

music went out today

16:01

whatever I'd like to take a second to

16:03

talk to you about this channel this is

16:05

actually Rick Bato 2 I've had it since

16:08

the beginning of my main Channel and

16:09

many of you are not subscribed as a

16:11

matter of fact 87% of the people that

16:14

watch this channel regularly are not

16:16

subscribed so I encourage you to hit the

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Subscribe button on this channel and on

16:20

my main Channel this will help me get

16:22

even more of my dream guests and help

16:24

continue to grow both channels thank you

16:27

when you're recording and mix ing on a