Trump lashes out angrily before his trial's opening statements

CNN
22 Apr 202410:43

Summary

TLDRCNN's special coverage focuses on the unprecedented criminal trial of former President Donald Trump, who is charged with falsifying business records to conceal an alleged affair with an adult film star. The trial's opening statements are anticipated, with the prosecution set to present their evidence and the defense to challenge witness credibility. A key witness, David Pecker, the former head of The National Enquirer, is expected to testify about 'catch and kill' schemes involving Trump's campaign. The trial's outcome could have significant implications for Trump's political future, with his legal team and supporters strategizing on how to navigate the situation both inside and outside the courtroom.

Takeaways

  • ๐Ÿ“ฐ CNN is providing special coverage of a unique event involving a former U.S. president, Donald Trump, who is facing criminal charges.
  • ๐Ÿ“‹ Trump is charged with falsifying business records to conceal a potentially damaging story about an affair with an adult film star, which he has consistently denied.
  • ๐Ÿค The first witness for the prosecution is David Pecker, former head of The National Enquirer, known for buying and suppressing stories that could harm Trump.
  • ๐Ÿ‘ฅ The trial involves a jury of 12, with alternates, who will hear opening statements and be presented with evidence by both the prosecution and defense.
  • ๐Ÿ“ˆ The prosecution will outline their case, including the evidence they have gathered against Trump, during their opening statement.
  • ๐Ÿ›ก๏ธ The defense, led by Todd Blanch, is expected to focus on the credibility of the witnesses, aiming to undermine the prosecution's case.
  • ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ David Pecker's testimony is significant as he has cooperated with prosecutors and may provide insights into 'catch and kill' schemes allegedly involving Trump's campaign and personal attorney Michael Cohen.
  • โณ Opening statements are not time-limited but are typically around an hour and a half, with the defense expected to be more concise.
  • ๐Ÿ’ฌ Trump has been vocal on social media, expressing anger and frustration about the trial, the gag order, and the implications for his reputation and upcoming election.
  • ๐Ÿ’ฐ Despite his advisers suggesting the trial could boost fundraising and support, there is uncertainty about how the general election audience will react to the trial's outcome.
  • ๐Ÿค” There is debate among Trump's advisors and legal experts about whether he should testify, with many arguing it poses significant risks and could be strategically self-defeating.

Q & A

  • What is the significance of the event being covered by CNN?

    -The event is significant because it involves a former president, Donald Trump, who is charged with falsifying business records to hide a potentially damaging story about an affair with a porn star, which could potentially lead to him being put behind bars.

  • What is the role of David Pecker in this case?

    -David Pecker, the former chairman of the publishing company that published The National Enquirer, is the first witness for the prosecution. He has agreed to cooperate with the prosecutors and is expected to speak about 'catch and kill' schemes related to negative stories about Donald Trump.

  • What are 'catch and kill' schemes?

    -Catch and kill schemes refer to the practice of purchasing exclusive rights to a story with the intention of burying it, thereby preventing the story from being published elsewhere. In this case, it is suggested that such schemes were used to silence negative stories about Donald Trump.

  • Why is the defense expected to focus on witness credibility?

    -The defense is expected to focus on witness credibility to challenge the prosecution's case. This is a common strategy in criminal trials where the defense attempts to cast doubt on the reliability and trustworthiness of the prosecution's witnesses.

  • What are the potential implications of this trial for Donald Trump's political future?

    -The trial could have significant implications for Donald Trump's political future, especially if he is convicted. It may affect his public image, his ability to run for office, and his support among voters, particularly in the lead-up to the next presidential election.

  • Why is there a gag order placed on Donald Trump?

    -A gag order is likely placed on Donald Trump to ensure a fair trial, preventing him from making public statements that could influence the jury or interfere with the legal process.

  • What is the general duration of opening statements in a trial?

    -Opening statements typically can take about an hour to an hour and 45 minutes, but there is no strict time limit. The duration depends on the attorneys and the complexity of the case.

  • What is the stance of South Dakota governor Kristi Noem regarding support for Donald Trump if he is convicted?

    -Governor Kristi Noem has stated that if her choice is between Joe Biden and Donald Trump, she would support Donald Trump, indicating a continued backing despite a potential conviction.

  • Why might Donald Trump's legal team advise against him testifying?

    -Testifying could be risky for Trump because it would expose him to cross-examination, where any inconsistencies or lies could significantly harm his case. It's generally advised that defendants only take the stand if it is absolutely necessary.

  • What is the public narrative that Donald Trump is trying to manage outside the courtroom?

    -Donald Trump is using social media to express his anger and frustration about the trial, the gag order, and the fact that he is a criminal defendant. This is part of his effort to control the public narrative and maintain his image ahead of the trial.

  • What is the potential strategy behind Donald Trump's public claim of intending to testify?

    -The public claim of intending to testify could be a strategic move to show confidence and to appeal to his political base. However, it may also be a bluff, as taking the stand could be detrimental to his case.

  • How might the non-televised nature of the trial impact Donald Trump's decision on whether to testify?

    -The non-televised nature of the trial might make it less appealing for Trump to testify, as the act of testifying would not directly benefit his public image or political narrative. It removes the potential advantage of using the stand as a platform to reach a wider audience.

Outlines

00:00

๐Ÿ“ฐ CNN's Special Coverage of Trump's Criminal Trial

This paragraph discusses the opening statements in a criminal trial involving former President Donald Trump. Trump is charged with falsifying business records to conceal an affair with a porn star, which he has denied. The first witness, David Pecker, ex-chairman of The National Enquirer, is expected to provide insight into 'catch and kill' schemes that Trump allegedly used to suppress negative stories. The summary also touches on the trial's potential impact on Trump's public image and political future, as well as his frustration with a gag order that prevents him from attacking witnesses publicly. The paragraph concludes with commentary on Trump's strategy and the likelihood of him testifying.

05:01

๐Ÿค” Trump's Strategy and Potential Testimony

The second paragraph delves into the strategic considerations for Trump's legal team and the former president's own public reactions to the trial. It discusses Trump's anger over the gag order, which prevents him from publicly countering witnesses, and the potential embarrassment and political fallout he faces, especially in the lead-up to the next presidential election. The paragraph also explores Trump's past claims about testifying and the risks associated with taking the stand. Legal experts suggest that testifying could be a tactical error, as it exposes Trump to contradictions and further scrutiny. The discussion includes a debate about whether Trump's public declarations about testifying are more about political posturing than actual intent to participate in the trial proceedings.

10:01

๐Ÿšซ Trump's Potential Public Response if Not Testifying

The final paragraph speculates on how Trump might publicly frame his decision if he chooses not to testify. It suggests that Trump could claim the prosecution's case was weak and that his attorneys effectively dismantled their arguments, making his own testimony unnecessary. The paragraph also notes the strategic advantage of the trial not being televised, which would affect how Trump's non-testimony could be communicated to the public and media. The discussion highlights the potential political narrative Trump might use to his advantage, emphasizing the perceived lack of evidence against him.

Mindmap

Keywords

๐Ÿ’กLower Manhattan

Lower Manhattan refers to the southernmost part of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is a key location in the context of this transcript as it is where the courthouse is located and where the trial is taking place. The mention of Lower Manhattan sets the scene for the high-profile legal proceedings discussed in the video.

๐Ÿ’กDonald Trump

Donald Trump is the 45th President of the United States and the central figure in this video's narrative. He is charged with falsifying business records in this case, which is a significant event as it involves a former president. His actions, reactions, and the implications of the trial on his political future are central to the video's theme.

๐Ÿ’กFalsifying business records

Falsifying business records is the act of intentionally altering or misrepresenting information in official business documents. In the context of the video, Donald Trump is accused of this crime to hide a potentially damaging story about an affair. This is the legal issue at the heart of the trial and the focus of the prosecution's case.

๐Ÿ’กPorn star

The term 'porn star' refers to an actor in the adult film industry. In this video, it is used to describe the individual with whom Donald Trump allegedly had an affair. The mention of a 'porn star' adds a sensational element to the case and is part of the reason why this trial is attracting significant media attention.

๐Ÿ’กThe National Enquirer

The National Enquirer is a supermarket tabloid newspaper known for its sensational stories. In the transcript, it is mentioned in connection with David Pecker, who once led the publication. The paper is infamous for 'catch and kill' schemes, where they would buy and suppress stories that could be damaging to certain individuals, such as Donald Trump, as part of the case against him.

๐Ÿ’กDavid Pecker

David Pecker is the former chairman of the company that published The National Enquirer. He is a key witness for the prosecution in this trial due to his involvement in the alleged 'catch and kill' schemes. Pecker's cooperation with prosecutors and his potential testimony are significant as they could provide evidence against Donald Trump.

๐Ÿ’กCatch and kill schemes

Catch and kill schemes refer to the practice of media outlets purchasing exclusive rights to a story with no intention of publishing it, effectively 'killing' the story. In the context of this video, it is alleged that such schemes were used to suppress negative stories about Donald Trump during the 2016 campaign, which is a critical part of the case against him.

๐Ÿ’กStormy Daniels

Stormy Daniels is an adult film actress who is central to the falsification of business records case against Donald Trump. It is alleged that Trump had an affair with Daniels and that his team used hush money payments to keep the story quiet. Her involvement is a key aspect of the trial and contributes to its high-profile nature.

๐Ÿ’กOpening statements

Opening statements are the initial presentations made by both the prosecution and defense at the start of a trial. They serve to outline the respective cases and provide the jury with a preview of the evidence and arguments that will be presented. In the video, the anticipation of the opening statements is a pivotal moment as it marks the official commencement of the trial proceedings.

๐Ÿ’กChief attorney

A chief attorney, in this case Todd Blanch representing Donald Trump, is the lead lawyer responsible for presenting the defense's case in court. The role and strategy of the chief attorney are crucial to the outcome of the trial. In the context of the video, Blanch's approach to the case and his opening statement are of particular interest.

๐Ÿ’กGag order

A gag order is a legal restraint that prevents certain information from being made public. In the video, it is mentioned in relation to Donald Trump's frustration with being unable to publicly comment on or criticize the proceedings. The gag order is a significant factor as it limits Trump's ability to influence public opinion and the narrative around the trial.

Highlights

CNN is providing special coverage of an unprecedented event in the United States: a criminal trial involving a former president, Donald Trump.

Donald Trump is charged with falsifying business records to conceal a potentially damaging story about an affair with a porn star, which he has consistently denied.

The prosecution's first witness will be David Pecker, the former chairman of the company that published The National Enquirer, known for 'catch and kill' schemes to protect Trump's image.

The trial involves allegations that Trump's team made hush money payments to silence negative stories during his 2016 campaign.

The opening statements are expected to begin shortly after the jurors assemble at 9:30 AM, outlining the prosecution and defense strategies.

Todd Blanch, Trump's chief attorney, is anticipated to focus on witness credibility during his opening statement.

David Pecker's testimony is significant as he has a cooperation deal with prosecutors and can provide insights into Trump's alleged efforts to suppress negative stories.

The trial could involve testimony from other witnesses, including those who were close to Trump, such as his former attorney Michael Cohen.

The duration of opening statements is not fixed, but they typically last about an hour and are designed not to overwhelm the jury.

Karen McDougal, another woman who accused Trump of an alleged affair, is expected to testify during the trial.

Trump's public and social media comments indicate his anger and frustration with the trial, the gag order, and the perception of unfairness.

Trump's advisers believe the trial could boost fundraising and support, but there is uncertainty about its impact on the general election.

South Dakota governor Kristi Noem expressed continued support for Trump, even if he is convicted, highlighting internal Republican dynamics.

Legal experts suggest that Trump should not take the stand due to the risks, as the prosecution has the burden of proof.

The discussion suggests that Trump's่กจๆ€ (stance) on testifying may be more about political posturing than actual intent to participate in the trial.

If Trump decides not to testify, his public narrative is likely to focus on the prosecution's case being weak and his attorneys' effectiveness.

The fact that the trial is not televised may influence Trump's decision not to testify, as it limits the direct impact on voters.

Transcripts

00:00

You were

00:00

looking at live

00:01

pictures of the courthouse

00:02

in Lower Manhattan.

00:03

This is CNN's

00:04

special coverage of an event

00:06

the likes of which

00:07

this country has never seen.

00:09

This morning,

00:10

we are standing by for opening statements

00:11

in a case that could

00:12

ultimately put a former president

00:15

behind bars.

00:16

Donald Trump is charged

00:17

with falsifying business records

00:19

to hide

00:19

a potentially damaging story

00:21

about an affair with a porn star.

00:23

This is something he has long denied.

00:25

This morning, brand new details

00:27

about the first witness,

00:28

the prosecution plans to call a man

00:31

who once led The National Enquirer.

00:33

And as The New York Times

00:34

put it, bought and buried stories

00:36

that could be damaging to Donald Trump.

00:39

CNN's Caitlin Paul is outside the court

00:42

this morning for the latest on what we

00:44

are expected to see. Caitlin

00:47

Well, John, those 18

00:49

jurors, the 12 jurors

00:50

that will judge Donald Trump,

00:52

plus the alternates,

00:53

they're all going to be coming in

00:53

to the courthouse by nine 30 today.

00:56

And then we're off in earnest

00:58

in this first criminal trial

01:00

against Donald Trump.

01:01

Opening statements will be taking place

01:03

this morning.

01:04

Expected to start pretty quickly

01:06

once the jurors

01:07

have assembled for the day.

01:09

And what they will be doing

01:11

is previewing

01:11

the contours of the case on both sides.

01:14

So the prosecutors

01:15

are going to give the jurors

01:17

and the public

01:18

a glimpse into all of the evidence

01:20

that they have collected

01:21

against Donald Trump

01:22

and want to present to him, represent

01:25

against him

01:25

over the course of the coming days.

01:27

That's what

01:27

their opening statement will be.

01:29

And then the defense team,

01:31

Todd Blanch, Donald Trump's

01:32

chief attorney,

01:34

is going to be giving

01:35

his opening statement.

01:36

We do expect that to be largely

01:38

about witness credibility,

01:40

trying to cut in to what

01:42

the prosecutors

01:42

are going to be putting on the stand.

01:44

The first witness

01:45

that will be David Pecker, he's

01:47

going to be called

01:48

as a witness for the prosecution.

01:50

He's the former chairman

01:52

of the publishing company

01:53

that was publishing

01:54

The National Enquirer.

01:56

And is a person

01:57

who has agreed to cooperate,

01:59

got a deal with prosecutors

02:01

and is stepping up at this time

02:03

to speak about very likely

02:05

what he knows of catch and kill schemes.

02:08

These schemes in 2016

02:09

that Donald Trump

02:10

and his campaign were interested in.

02:13

And his personal attorney,

02:14

Michael Cohen, were interested in

02:15

to collect

02:16

negative stories

02:17

about Donald Trump,

02:18

put money

02:19

toward the people who had those stories,

02:21

whose those stories were theirs to tell

02:23

and silence them.

02:24

A very big thing

02:26

not just for Stormy

02:27

Daniels who is at the core of this

02:29

falsification of business records case,

02:31

but also for other witnesses

02:32

who are likely to be called to testify

02:35

against the former president.

02:36

Caitlin, how long will

02:37

the opening statements be?

02:38

Do we know?

02:39

In just a little bit

02:40

more on David Pecker,

02:41

because you said he reached

02:43

an immunity deal with federal prosecutors

02:45

what is it that he has admitted or

02:47

conceded to in the past?

02:51

Well, John, as far as opening statements,

02:53

there isn't a time limit on

02:55

how long

02:55

these attorneys will go,

02:56

but they're not going to bore the jury

02:58

to start out this day.

03:00

Typically, opening statements can take,

03:02

you know, an hour.

03:03

45 minutes, something like that.

03:04

I understand

03:05

from my sources that on the defense side,

03:07

it's not going to be very long at all.

03:09

But as far as David Pecker

03:11

being the first person

03:12

up on the witness stand

03:13

and what he's going to be speaking about,

03:15

he is particularly attuned to

03:18

what had happened

03:19

with another woman

03:20

who accused Donald Trump

03:21

of an alleged affair,

03:23

a woman named Karen McDougal,

03:24

who is expected to be testifying

03:26

at some point against Trump

03:28

during this trial.

03:29

Sort of

03:29

to paint that portrait

03:31

of all of the motivations of Trump

03:33

to allegedly falsify

03:35

these business records.

03:37

And so he would be a person

03:38

that can give a window

03:39

into the entire atmosphere of what

03:42

Donald Trump wanted to do

03:44

and what may have motivated him

03:45

in 2016

03:47

to want to pay off stormy Daniels.

03:49

Very very interesting.

03:51

Great explanations.

03:52

Great to have you down there

03:53

for this moment in history.

03:54

Caitlin, Paul Lance thank you very much.

03:56

Kate.

03:57

So before Trump's

03:57

legal team

03:58

begins laying out their legal strategy

04:00

inside court,

04:01

Donald Trump is doing his level

04:02

best to have his say outside

04:04

of the courtroom,

04:05

lashing out on social media

04:06

against the district attorney

04:08

the gag order.

04:09

The fact

04:09

that he even needs to be in court

04:11

and more all this weekend, part

04:13

of his continued effort

04:14

to manage the narrative

04:16

before having to sit silently

04:17

before the jury.

04:18

CNN's Alina Trina has much more on this.

04:20

She's joining us now.

04:21

What are you hearing about

04:23

Donald Trump's

04:23

thinking going into this week?

04:26

Because you look at social media

04:27

or how he talked outside of court

04:29

on Friday. He's he seems angry for sure.

04:33

He is angry, Kate.

04:34

And I can

04:35

say his public comments,

04:37

his raging about this being unfair,

04:39

his frustration

04:41

with the gag order placed on him,

04:43

all of that is also playing out

04:44

behind the scenes.

04:45

He very much

04:46

does not want to be a criminal defendant

04:49

in any trial.

04:51

But this one in particular,

04:52

I think is very personal

04:54

for Donald Trump.

04:54

And remember,

04:55

a lot of salacious details are expected

04:58

to come out of this.

04:58

You're going to be hearing from people

05:00

who have been very close

05:01

to him in the past,

05:02

people like Michael Cohen, his former

05:03

attorney and fixer,

05:05

as they referred to him.

05:06

That's part of the reason as well

05:07

that he's very angry about this gag order

05:09

because he's not able to attack

05:11

witnesses.

05:11

That's something that he is particularly

05:14

very frustrated about.

05:16

But a lot of this as well

05:17

could be embarrassing for Donald Trump.

05:19

And he does not want this

05:20

on display, particularly in the lead

05:23

up to his next presidential election

05:25

ahead of November.

05:26

And, you know, if you think back to what

05:29

this is really about,

05:30

it's about alleged payments

05:32

to a porn star

05:33

that he allegedly had an affair with

05:35

and then used hush money payments

05:36

to try and cover that up

05:38

during his first campaign ahead of 2016.

05:40

And again,

05:41

when it comes down to it, you strip

05:42

all the bluster,

05:43

what you think about Donald Trump.

05:44

This is not something

05:45

he wants to be sitting through.

05:46

Now, I also just want to point out

05:48

that as much as his advisers are saying

05:50

that they think this trial

05:52

could help him with fundraising,

05:54

this could boost his support

05:56

and donations.

05:57

They really don't know

05:58

particularly how

05:59

this is going to play out

06:00

because it is in a general election.

06:02

What we saw happen during the primary

06:03

when he was indicted

06:04

is not necessarily

06:05

going to be the same thing

06:06

that happens in adrenaline.

06:08

So I keep that in mind.

06:09

Now, I also just want to point

06:10

your attention to Kate, some of this.

06:13

This interview

06:14

we had with the South

06:15

Dakota governor, Kristi Noem, yesterday,

06:17

she was speaking with Dana Bash.

06:18

She had a very interesting two response

06:20

about how it could be playing with some

06:22

of his allies. Take a listen.

06:26

If Donald Trump is

06:27

convicted in this trial,

06:29

will you still support him in November?

06:32

If my choice is between Joe Biden

06:34

and Donald Trump

06:35

every single day of the week, yes,

06:36

I will support Donald Trump.

06:38

I have from the very beginning

06:41

Now, pretty stunning answer, Kate,

06:43

from Kristi Noem.

06:44

But I think that just underscores as well

06:47

how they're unsure of what could happen

06:49

if he is ultimately convicted in this.

06:51

How will this play out?

06:52

He knows,

06:53

though, that he has his best defenders

06:55

out there on the airwaves,

06:56

like Kristi Noem

06:58

rehashing talking points

06:59

that the campaign

07:00

has given them to support him.

07:02

And so I think you're going to continue

07:03

to see interviews like that

07:04

in the days to come.

07:05

That's for sure.

07:06

It's good to see you.

07:06

And we'll see what today brings for sure.

07:09

Donald Trump

07:10

vowing to take the stand,

07:11

insisting once again on Friday

07:13

he plans to testify.

07:14

Now, we have heard this

07:15

from the former president

07:16

before in his civil fraud trial

07:18

last year.

07:18

He was set to testify for a second time,

07:20

but he canceled just 24 hours notice.

07:23

Our panel is back.

07:24

Ellie, would you do it if you were Trump?

07:26

Would you testify?

07:27

I mean, can you even answer that question

07:28

at this stage? Right.

07:29

So that's a

07:30

that's a really good question,

07:31

because the real answer is

07:31

you cannot answer it.

07:32

You don't have to answer it

07:33

until the moment you take the stand.

07:35

You get one of the benefits

07:36

of being a defendant

07:37

is you get to see

07:38

the prosecution's entire case.

07:40

How your lawyer does,

07:41

trying to undermine it, see how you feel.

07:43

But the short answer is no.

07:45

Hell, no.

07:46

I would not take the stand.

07:47

I would not advise him to take the stand.

07:48

There's no reason

07:49

for him to take the stand.

07:50

It's incredibly risky.

07:52

Like I said

07:53

before, the prosecution bears the burden

07:55

of proving their case

07:55

beyond a reasonable doubt.

07:57

Anyone who takes

07:57

the stand is taking an enormous risk.

07:59

I know on TV,

08:00

everyone takes the stand

08:01

because it's dramatic.

08:02

It's quite rare in the real world here

08:04

if you're Donald Trump.

08:05

I mean, look, it would just be a disaster

08:07

if you get caught in a contradiction

08:09

or as a defendant

08:10

taking the stand, it's over.

08:12

If you get caught in a lie,

08:14

if the jury doesn't like you, it's over.

08:16

So I would beg, plead, urge him.

08:18

I don't think he is

08:19

going to take the stand.

08:20

I think he's positioning right now.

08:21

I just it's so tactically self-defeating.

08:23

I can't see it happening.

08:25

I mean, Frank, what is Trump doing there?

08:28

It almost seems to me like he feels like,

08:30

you know,

08:30

people think he was a coward

08:32

if he said no, basically.

08:33

Correct me if wrong,

08:34

he has to be there,

08:34

at least physically be there.

08:36

Yeah.

08:37

But he doesn't have to take the stand.

08:38

Right.

08:38

So he doesn't have to take the stand.

08:39

I mean,

08:40

I think this is the type of bluster.

08:41

I mean, you asked Donald Trump,

08:43

are you are

08:43

you mad enough to take the stand?

08:45

He's going to say, yes, I'm doing this.

08:47

And it's easy to bait him into that. Yes.

08:49

Whether he means it or not,

08:51

I mean, I don't know if he knows if

08:52

he means it in his own head.

08:54

Matt, what do you think?

08:55

Yeah.

08:55

No, I think to certain

08:57

I completely agree with you.

08:57

He's going to

08:58

of course, say yes

08:59

and then he's going to say, you know,

09:00

well, you know,

09:01

I can't do it for this or that.

09:02

I completely agree.

09:03

And I think he makes a good point

09:05

where the jury pool is

09:05

so tainted against him,

09:07

I'm taking the stand I could see he's

09:10

simply poisoning it.

09:11

But I think also it's important

09:12

to remember

09:13

his messaging

09:14

about taking the stand isn't

09:16

necessarily about the trial.

09:17

It is about the politics of it.

09:19

And I think he's speaking

09:20

to a very different audience

09:21

necessarily than the jurors.

09:23

I think Frank would appreciate

09:23

this is this is the same.

09:25

Yeah, I think this is the same bluff.

09:27

He's calling on debates,

09:28

to be honest with you.

09:29

It's like he's

09:30

you know,

09:30

he's kind of marching around

09:32

saying any time, anywhere.

09:33

Of course I'll do it.

09:34

I mean, you know,

09:35

but at the end of the day,

09:36

do I think he actually wants to debate

09:38

Joe Biden?

09:38

I actually don't think that he does.

09:39

And I think it will be really interesting

09:40

to see how that plays out.

09:41

But it's like the same

09:43

it's the same bravado

09:44

and it's the same kind

09:45

of political posturing.

09:46

But because I'd be surprised

09:48

if Biden is

09:49

I think Biden is the one

09:50

that actually doesn't want to debate.

09:51

But we can have

09:51

people that for another day,

09:52

we got enough news.

09:53

I would say, look,

09:54

he may not

09:55

I would say I actually think he should.

09:57

I think any time