erewhon hauls, ozempic, and chefluencers

Mina Le
30 Apr 202435:12

Summary

TLDRThe video script by Mina Le explores the intersection of food, fashion, and culture, highlighting the rising trend of luxury food consumption among Gen Z and millennials. Mina discusses the economic 'lipstick effect,' where people indulge in small luxuries like food during economic downturns. She also touches on the historical context of food as a status symbol, referencing Louis XIV's extravagant banquets and the modern interpretation by fashion houses like Moschino. The script delves into the organic food industry's challenges, the influence of social media on food trends, and the emergence of 'chefluencers.' It also addresses the fashion industry's complex relationship with food and body image, and the potential impact of appetite-suppressing drugs like Ozempic on the food industry.

Takeaways

  • 🎨 The video discusses the intersection of fashion, food, wellness, and beauty, highlighting how these areas are interconnected and influence each other.
  • 💅 Mina Le shares her personal experience with a high-production photoshoot where her nails were done by a professional manicurist, reflecting on the impact of such experiences on her content creation.
  • 🍽️ The script touches on the cultural significance of food as a status symbol, especially among younger generations like Gen Z, and how luxury food purchases have risen post-pandemic.
  • 🛒 It mentions Erewhon, a high-end supermarket in LA, as an example of the luxury food trend and discusses the economic phenomenon known as the 'lipstick effect'.
  • 📚 References to historical examples like Louis XIV and Marie Antoinette are used to draw parallels between past and present perceptions of luxury and extravagance in food and fashion.
  • 👗 The script explores the role of fashion in power and status, citing Valerie Steele's insights on how Louis XIV used fashion and aesthetics to project a modern, powerful image.
  • 🌱 Discussion on the rise of healthy eating trends and the associated costs, touching on the history of the organic movement and the current state of the 'big organic' industry.
  • 🚀 The influence of social media on cooking and food trends is examined, with the emergence of 'chefluencers' or cooking influencers, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 👙 The script comments on the fashion industry's complex relationship with food, contrasting the promotion of thin body ideals with the use of food in advertising and editorials.
  • 💊 There's a mention of the drug Ozempic and its potential impact on the food industry due to its appetite-suppressing effects, raising concerns about future food consumption trends.
  • 🍕 The video concludes with a critique of the fashion industry's past promotion of unhealthy dieting tips and a call for a shift towards healthier snacks, not just as a response to diet drugs but for public health.

Q & A

  • What is the main topic of discussion in the video?

    -The main topic of discussion in the video is the trendification of food, its connection to wellness, fashion, and beauty, and the impact of these trends on society and the food industry.

  • Why does Mina Le feel distracted while talking about food?

    -Mina Le feels distracted because she recently got her nails done in a high-production shoot with a manicurist on set, resulting in long talons that are affecting her ability to do everyday tasks.

  • What is the 'lipstick effect' mentioned by Mina Le?

    -The 'lipstick effect' is an economic phenomenon where, during times of economic downturn, people stop spending on big-ticket items and instead spend on smaller luxury items like lipstick to boost their morale.

  • What is the connection between luxury food purchases and the 'lipstick effect'?

    -The connection is that during economic downturns, people still seek to engage in some form of luxury consumption to feel good, and luxury food purchases serve as a modern equivalent to the 'lipstick effect' where small indulgences compensate for the inability to buy larger luxury items.

  • Why is Erewhon mentioned in the video?

    -Erewhon is mentioned as an example of a luxury supermarket chain in LA that has gained significant hype online, with reports of young people working multiple jobs to afford daily spending at Erewhon, highlighting the trend of food as a status symbol.

  • What is the role of social media in the rise of food trends?

    -Social media plays a significant role in the rise of food trends by providing a platform for influencers to share cooking content, promote certain types of food as trendy or luxurious, and by fostering a community around food-related interests.

  • What is the term used to describe an influencer who makes cooking videos for social media?

    -The term used is 'chefluencer', which is a blend of the words 'chef' and 'influencer'.

  • How does the fashion industry's history of promoting thinness affect the perception of models and food?

    -The fashion industry's history of promoting thinness has led to a distrust and skepticism when thin models or influencers post about food, especially unhealthy food. This is because it contradicts the industry's past promotion of unhealthy dieting habits.

  • What is the significance of the Ozempic drug in the context of the food industry?

    -Ozempic, a drug originally designed to help regulate diabetes, has gained attention for its appetite-reducing side effects and potential misuse as a weight loss method. Its rise could impact the food industry if it leads to reduced food consumption due to decreased appetite.

  • How does the video discuss the portrayal of food in fashion media?

    -The video discusses the portrayal of food in fashion media as a means of exploring women's consumption and sexual appetite, often using the 'gluttonous gamine' trope where thin models are depicted next to large amounts of food without actually consuming it.

  • What is the potential impact of drugs like Ozempic on the food industry, according to the video?

    -According to the video, drugs like Ozempic have the potential to significantly impact the food industry by reducing overall food consumption if they become widely used for appetite suppression. This could lead to changes in the types of products offered by food companies.

Outlines

00:00

🍽️ Introduction to Food, Fashion, and Culture

Mina Le introduces the topic of the video, which revolves around food, wellness, and fashion. She discusses the connection between these areas and how they are all part of culture. Mina shares her recent experience with a high-production photoshoot where her nails were done by a professional manicurist on set, leading to a discussion on the cultural significance of food and its status as a symbol, especially among Gen Z. She cites a Vogue Business report on the luxury food trend and the rise of expensive supermarket chains like Erewhon, which has gained popularity despite its high costs.

05:01

👑 The Historical Context of Food as a Status Symbol

The video delves into the historical context of food as a luxury item, using the example of Louis XIV's banquets to illustrate the extravagance of the French aristocracy. It discusses the 'service a la francaise' and the emphasis on aesthetics in food presentation. The influence of Louis XIV and Marie Antoinette on contemporary culture is explored, including the portrayal of their lifestyles in fashion and film. The video also touches on the concept of the 'lipstick effect' and its role in luxury food purchases.

10:02

🌱 The Rise and Critique of the Organic Movement

Mina discusses the growth of the organic food movement in the 1960s and its principles of sustainability and health. However, she criticizes the current state of the organic industry, suggesting it has become a form of greenwashing. She explains how large organic companies, or 'big organic,' often engage in practices that contradict the original values of the movement, such as long-distance transportation and unethical labor. The video also mentions consumer willingness to pay a premium for perceived wellbeing and the challenges faced by small, ethical farms.

15:04

📈 The Impact of Social Media and Influencers on Food Trends

The video explores the rise of social media's influence on food trends, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. It discusses the emergence of 'chefluencers,' individuals who create cooking content on social media, and the public's growing interest in cooking and healthy eating. Mina talks about the role of social media in promoting certain food trends and products, and how it has led to an increase in the consumption of superfoods and probiotic foods. She also mentions the influence of celebrities and models on food trends and the public's perception of these trends.

20:05

🍕 The Fashion Industry's Complex Relationship with Food

Mina examines the fashion industry's historical promotion of unhealthy dieting practices and its complex relationship with food. She discusses the industry's use of food in photoshoots and advertisements, often positioning thin models next to abundant food, a concept known as the 'gluttonous gamine.' The video touches on the controversy surrounding models and food, the public's skepticism towards thin influencers' food choices, and the industry's evolving attitudes towards food and body image.

25:07

💊 The Potential Impact of Appetite-Suppressing Drugs on the Food Industry

The video concludes with a discussion on the rise of appetite-suppressing drugs like Ozempic and their potential impact on the food industry. Mina expresses concern about the misuse of these drugs for weight loss rather than their intended medical purpose. She mentions the potential risks to the food industry if these drugs become widely used, leading to reduced food consumption. The video also highlights the responsibility of the food industry to adapt to changing consumer behaviors and preferences, while hoping for a shift towards healthier snack options.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Luxury Food

Luxury food refers to high-end, often expensive, food items that are considered a status symbol. In the video, it is discussed how certain Gen Z individuals treat luxury food purchases similar to buying luxury items or merchandise, highlighting a shift in consumption habits even amidst economic downturns. An example given is Erewhon, an upscale supermarket chain in LA, which has garnered significant attention and spending from young consumers.

💡Lipstick Effect

The lipstick effect is an economic theory suggesting that during times of economic stress, consumers tend to spend on smaller, non-essential items that provide comfort or pleasure, such as lipstick. The video uses this concept to explain the rise in luxury food purchases as a form of self-treatment or indulgence when larger expenditures, like vacations or vehicles, are less feasible.

💡Chefluencer

A chefluencer is a social media influencer who creates content related to cooking and food preparation, often with an emphasis on aesthetics and presentation. The video discusses the rise of chefluencers, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, as more people began cooking at home and seeking cooking inspiration online. This trend has also led to some influencers gaining popularity by incorporating elements of performance and theatrics into their cooking content.

💡Wellness

Wellness is a concept that encompasses a holistic approach to health and well-being, which includes diet and nutrition. The video highlights a growing trend among younger generations, such as Gen Z and millennials, towards purchasing wellness products and services, including superfoods and probiotics. This trend is driven by increased access to health information and a desire for community and appearance enhancement.

💡Organic Food

Organic food is produced according to certain standards that forbid the use of synthetic pesticides, chemical fertilizers, genetically modified organisms, and other artificial additives. The video discusses the history and current state of the organic food industry, noting that while it began as a movement for sustainability and health, it has been criticized for 'greenwashing' and allowing practices that may not align with its original principles. The term is used in the context of discussing the cost of healthy eating and the challenges faced by small, ethical farms.

💡French Aristocracy

The French aristocracy, particularly figures like Louis XIV and Marie Antoinette, are used in the video as historical examples of luxury and extravagance in food consumption. Their lifestyles and the manner in which they used food as a display of power and status continue to influence modern perceptions of luxury and food as a status symbol.

💡Food as a Status Symbol

Throughout the video, food is presented as a status symbol, especially among younger generations. The discussion covers how the consumption of luxury food items, eating at high-end restaurants, and the purchase of expensive, healthy, or organic foods are seen as indicators of social status and wealth.

💡Health and Wellness Industry

The health and wellness industry encompasses products and services that aim to improve overall well-being, including the food and beverage sector. The video notes that this industry has grown significantly, with a particular focus on food-related purchases such as superfoods and probiotics, reflecting a broader cultural shift towards health consciousness.

💡Social Media Influencer

A social media influencer is an individual who has the ability to influence the opinions and buying decisions of their followers, typically through creating content on social media platforms. The video discusses the role of influencers in popularizing certain food trends, promoting wellness products, and the rise of chefluencers who use their online presence to share cooking content and recipes.

💡Big Organic

Big organic refers to large-scale organic food producers that use industrial farming methods, despite adhering to USDA organic standards. The video critiques this segment of the industry for potentially engaging in practices that contradict the sustainable and ethical ideals associated with organic food, such as long-distance transportation and unethical labor practices.

💡Grotesque Body

The grotesque body, as defined by philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin and discussed in the video, is a body that embraces the realities of human functions such as eating, drinking, and excreting. The concept is used to contrast with the classical body often portrayed in fashion, where models are depicted next to food but not engaging with it. The video suggests that the fashion industry's traditional emphasis on the classical body may be evolving with the increased presence of food in fashion and discussions around body positivity.

Highlights

Mina Le discusses the intersection of fashion, media, culture, wellness, and beauty, and their connection to food.

The cultural significance of food as a status symbol, especially among Gen Z, is highlighted by Vogue Business' findings.

The rise of luxury food purchases is partly attributed to the 'lipstick effect', an economic phenomenon where people splurge on small luxuries during economic downturns.

Erewhon, an expensive supermarket chain in LA, has gained significant attention for its popularity among young consumers willing to work extra jobs to afford its products.

The historical context of luxury food is explored, comparing modern trends to the extravagant feasts of Louis XIV.

The influence of French aristocracy on fashion and food culture is discussed, with examples from Marie Antoinette and modern fashion shows.

The shift towards healthy eating and its impact on the perception of luxury in the food industry is analyzed.

The role of social media in promoting food trends and the rise of the 'chefluencer' is examined.

The transcript explores the skepticism around thin influencers and models promoting food, due to the fashion industry's history of promoting unhealthy body ideals.

The potential impact of appetite-suppressing drugs like Ozempic on the food industry is discussed, with concerns about reduced food consumption.

The transcript addresses the controversy of models and celebrities appearing to consume high-calorie foods while maintaining thin figures.

The fashion industry's use of food in photoshoots and its complex relationship with body image and eating habits is critiqued.

The potential for food trends to shift due to the influence of health and wellness, and the role of pharmaceuticals in weight loss is considered.

The transcript questions the ethics of using food as a status symbol and the implications for public health versus corporate interests.

The hope for a future where healthier snack options are available, not just as a response to dieting drugs but as a commitment to public health.

The video concludes with a call for a balance between food as a cultural and status symbol and the need for healthier, more accessible food options for the general public.

Transcripts

00:00

(gentle music)

00:04

- Oh, hot.

00:06

(bird chirping)

00:08

(cat purring)

00:10

Hi, my name is Mina Le.

00:12

And on this channel I talk about fashion, food.

00:15

No, that's not right.

00:17

Fashion, media, and culture.

00:19

But today I am gonna be talking about food.

00:22

(gentle music)

00:29

- Is Ozempic right for me?

00:35

- Hmm.

00:36

- I wanted to know if you'd like to go out

00:37

to dinner with me Saturday.

00:38

- I'm like super distracted at this moment

00:40

because I just got my nails done the other day.

00:42

I had previously gotten my nails done recently,

00:44

but then I was at this shoot and it was very high production

00:48

because there was a manicurist on set.

00:49

I have never been to a shoot with a manicurist on set.

00:51

And they wanted a different look for my nails

00:54

so they gave me these talons.

00:57

I don't think there were any photographs

00:59

that actually showed my hands

01:00

because they were all portraits.

01:02

So that was kind of like sad 'cause they look sickening.

01:06

But the downside is

01:07

I don't really ever keep my nails this long.

01:09

Like this is like really, this is really long for me

01:12

because I grew up playing piano and you know,

01:14

you just like can't play piano with long nails.

01:16

But I can't do anything.

01:17

I feel like I'm Edward Scissorhands right now.

01:19

Okay, so yeah, today I am talking about food,

01:21

but I will be talking also about like

01:23

wellness and fashion and beauty because it's all connected.

01:26

I don't know, I was like inspired to do this

01:28

because I don't know if I'm just at the age

01:30

where food becomes more topical

01:32

because I perpetually feel like my body can't bounce back

01:35

from a diet of instant ramen and iced coffee anymore

01:38

or if something specifically has shifted

01:41

in the cultural zeitgeist.

01:42

But whatever it is, I'm not alone,

01:44

because apparently zoomers care a lot about food.

01:47

Vogue Business reported last year,

01:50

coming out of the pandemic and into a recession,

01:52

food has remained a status symbol

01:54

for some price sensitive Gen Zs,

01:57

much like a luxury item or piece of music merch,

01:59

experts agree.

02:00

Out of 166 16 to 24-year-old

02:03

Teen Vogue, Glamour, and Allure readers in the US,

02:05

more than half have bought

02:06

what they consider to be luxury food or drink.

02:09

in the last year.

02:10

Probably no other luxury food business has gotten

02:12

as much hype online as Erewhon,

02:14

an expensive supermarket chain in LA.

02:17

Last year, The Cut published a viral piece

02:19

on zoomers reportedly working two jobs

02:22

to afford daily Erewhon,

02:24

spending upwards of $200 a week.

02:26

I think the rise in luxury food purchases is in part

02:29

the lipstick effect at work.

02:31

The lipstick effect is this economic phenomenon

02:34

where people stop spending money on big ticket items

02:36

like a fancy car or luxury vacation

02:38

and instead treat themselves to small things

02:41

that make them feel good like lipstick,

02:43

hence the name.

02:44

It's this idea that basically

02:45

no matter what the economic circumstances are,

02:48

people still want to engage in

02:50

some kind of frivolous consumption to make them feel better.

02:54

- There's so many beautiful things out there to buy,

02:56

how can you possibly resist them?

02:57

- So today I wanna talk about food trends,

02:59

the Gen Z and millennial focus on wellness and organics,

03:02

the luxury coating of food itself,

03:04

and the rise of the chefluencer.

03:11

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03:58

(keyboard clacking)

04:00

In her 2016 book

04:01

"Feast for the Eyes: The Story of Food in Photography,"

04:03

Susan Bright wrote,

04:05

"Ultimately, food is not only about literal taste,

04:07

but also about Taste with a capital T,

04:09

both the lifestyles we aspire to

04:11

and the building blocks of culture itself.

04:13

- People's idea of luxury right now isn't even luxury.

04:17

It's somebody being able to go to the grocery store

04:19

and get a full cart and call it a grocery hall.

04:22

- Even though it feels dystopian to say

04:23

that food is a luxury,

04:24

this has always been the case.

04:26

The rich have always had a different diet

04:29

from the middle class and the poor.

04:30

For example, the food served at Louis XIV's banquets

04:33

in the 17th century were more lavish

04:35

than any of the food eaten in the rest of France.

04:37

His chefs would request exotic foods from other countries

04:40

or ingredients that were rare and expensive.

04:42

Louis XIV stomach was allegedly

04:45

three times the size of an average adult.

04:47

(somber music)

04:52

And even the manner of eating was vastly different.

04:55

One practice that was formalized during his reign

04:57

but was actually popular during the Middle Ages,

04:59

so he didn't invent this,

05:00

it's the service a la francaise,

05:03

which is a system by which the dishes for each course are

05:06

laid out all on the table all at once,

05:08

emphasizing the aesthetic importance of presenting the food

05:11

and making sure that the dishes

05:13

all like go together aesthetically.

05:15

Louis' banquets also featured musicians and dancers

05:18

for additional entertainment

05:19

and there was this idea that

05:21

each banquet had to outdo the last.

05:24

Louis put a high value on aesthetics during his reign

05:26

and his court invested heavily

05:28

in France's art's, fashion and cuisine.

05:29

And the impact can be felt still today

05:32

with the way that people romanticize France.

05:34

According to fashion historian Valerie Steele,

05:36

"The theater of power was very important.

05:39

Louis XIV wanted to make sure that his appearance

05:41

and the appearance of his courtiers

05:43

were in accordance with his idea of being

05:45

a modern, powerful, civilized monarch,

05:48

no longer just a warrior king from the Middle Ages,

05:51

but a real kind of Sun King

05:53

with all the kinds of mythological connotations."

05:56

Yeah, if you didn't know,

05:57

Louis XIV was also called the Sun King.

06:01

The last French queen Marie Antoinette

06:02

continues to carry the legacy of French aristocracy

06:05

and I'd argue is actually more linked with extravagance

06:10

than Louis XIV,

06:11

at least in like popular culture.

06:13

The most famous pop culture example is of course

06:16

Sofia Coppola's "Marie Antoinette,"

06:18

which features the iconic I want candy sequence

06:21

that takes absolutely no prisoners

06:22

in showing the level of excess afforded to her in real life.

06:25

As Elizabeth Way writes,

06:27

"Fashion and food may be

06:28

the most potent symbols of aristocratic extravagance

06:31

and these ideas persist in contemporary culture."

06:33

- Let them eat cake.

06:35

- For Moschino Fall Winter 2020 collection,

06:38

Jeremy Scott dressed his models in garments

06:40

that looks like cakes and pastries.

06:42

The collection intended to draw attention

06:44

to decadence and class inequality.

06:47

References to Marie Antoinette

06:49

were used to really drive home the theme.

06:51

According to the runway show notes,

06:53

"The confectionary cocktail dresses stand as a sly comment

06:56

on the denseness of certain people in power."

07:00

Even though you could say that critiquing class

07:03

by producing a luxury collection is

07:07

having your cake and eating it too.

07:09

No pun intended.

07:10

Scott has said about it,

07:11

"All I can do is offer respite.

07:13

Even if you continue to fight, you need that moment of joy.

07:16

We all need something uplifting.

07:18

My role on this Earth has only ever been

07:20

to spread joy and bring happiness."

07:22

(gentle music)

07:26

(keyboard clacking)

07:29

It seems like today, to the mainstream at least,

07:32

daily healthy groceries is probably considered

07:34

more luxurious than like elaborate, buttery, one-off meals

07:37

allied dining at a French restaurant.

07:39

Though I think just because of

07:41

how dominant the French are in high culture,

07:42

French food will probably

07:44

always be considered luxurious on some level,

07:46

so I'm like not worried about them.

07:48

Given the shift towards healthy eating,

07:50

I thought I'd give a brief overview about

07:51

why healthy food costs so much.

07:53

There's actually so much more than what I'm going to say,

07:55

so I highly suggest reading

07:57

"Food Power" by Brian L. McDonald

07:58

if you wanna learn more about his food system.

08:00

I like relied on it very heavily for all my discoveries.

08:03

But I'm going to start in the 1950s.

08:05

The 1950s is stereotyped as being like the casserole era

08:08

and also the era of those

08:10

really weird gross-looking savory gelatin dishes.

08:14

I love being Asian.

08:16

The '50s was also known for

08:17

bringing convenient foods into the American diet

08:20

such as frozen orange juice concentrate

08:22

and canned chicken breast,

08:24

which I don't even know if they still sell

08:26

because I don't think I've ever seen that on the shelves.

08:28

Packaged cake mixes were first introduced in 1947

08:31

and by 1957 accounted for

08:33

more than half of the homemade cakes in America.

08:35

People liked these pre-made or easy to prep food options

08:39

because it gave them more flexibility

08:40

to manage their schedules.

08:42

As Fortune described the trend in 1953,

08:45

"With babies to take care of,

08:46

jobs to hold down, and maids scarce,

08:48

housewives look to the food processors to perform

08:51

many of the services formally carried on

08:53

in the family kitchen."

08:54

Changing food preferences helped grow the food market

08:56

to a $60 billion industry in 1953.

09:00

$10 billion more than industry specialists had predicted.

09:03

And on the flip side,

09:05

home production of foods AKA foods grown in home gardens

09:08

continued to decline from at least

09:10

1/3 of America's food production before World War I

09:13

to 18% in 1942 to just 8% in 1955.

09:18

There were also all these technological breakthroughs

09:20

that made food production faster,

09:22

created more secure packaging,

09:23

and better preserved food texture and flavor.

09:26

What this also meant though was that

09:27

many produced products were roughly the same.

09:30

As a result, companies spent more

09:32

on advertising and promotional efforts

09:33

to make their products more appealing than competitors

09:36

with the hopes of building brand loyalty.

09:39

♪ Soup and sandwich ♪

09:40

♪ Soup and sandwich ♪

09:43

♪ Have your favorite Campbell's soup and sandwich ♪

09:46

- For example, one grocery store advertisement from 1955

09:49

urged shoppers to stockpile only quality IGA brand foods

09:54

to prepare for a nuclear attack.

09:56

By 1954, the USDA reported that the value added

09:59

by manufacturing and food processing had risen considerably

10:02

and Americans were paying $4 billion a year more,

10:05

adjusted for price changes,

10:07

than they did a 1939 for the convenience of products

10:10

that transferred some of the work of food preparation

10:12

from the home to the factory.

10:13

But then in the 1960s an organic movement grew traction

10:17

with principles focused on offering

10:18

a sustainable, healthy, fair, and safe alternative

10:21

to the corporate monster

10:22

that industrialized agriculture had become.

10:25

Organic agriculture sought to bring

10:26

food production systems back to the land

10:29

and operate within the limits of nature.

10:31

Nowadays the term organic is arguably greenwashing.

10:35

I'd recommend reading

10:36

Michael Pollan's "The Omnivore's Dilemma"

10:38

to get a better understanding of the industry.

10:40

But in short, the USDA implemented

10:42

a very watery set of standards

10:44

for what's considered organic.

10:45

Pollan calls the large companies

10:47

that produce organic food using industrial methods

10:50

as big organic.

10:51

And although they grow products

10:53

without synthetic pesticides and fertilizers

10:55

as required by the USDA,

10:56

they often engage in long distance transportation,

10:59

energy-intensive production, unethical migrant labor,

11:02

and animal cruelty.

11:03

As an example, on his book,

11:05

Pollan talks about a company called Petaluma Poultry.

11:08

He picked up a chicken from this company

11:09

from the supermarket

11:10

that claimed to be a sustainably farmed, free-range,

11:13

and even the company gave this chicken a name Rosie.

11:16

He ended up visiting the farm

11:17

and found it to be more of an animal factory.

11:20

Rosie lived in a shed with a 20,000 other Rosies

11:23

who lived very similar lives

11:24

to any other industrial chicken.

11:26

Other than the fact that their feet is certified organic,

11:28

the free-range label was allowed

11:30

because there was a little door in the shed

11:32

that led to a narrow grassy yard,

11:34

but the door remained shut

11:35

until the birds were at least five or six weeks old

11:38

to prevent them from potentially catching any diseases

11:41

and then the chickens were slaughtered only two weeks later.

11:44

So for most of their life they spend it

11:46

not seeing any sunlight or grass.

11:49

Well, I can believe that organic feed and fertilizers

11:51

cost more than synthetic ones,

11:53

which might justify a higher price

11:54

for organic goods than non-organic.

11:57

I also often wonder if organic industrial farms

12:01

know they can upcharge more

12:03

because people assume that these farms,

12:05

these companies are going above and beyond

12:08

a standard commercial farm

12:09

when in reality they aren't.

12:11

I mean studies show Americans are prepared to pay premium

12:14

to enhance their wellbeing.

12:15

Regardless the ability for big organic to function

12:17

means that smaller, more ethical farms are squashed out.

12:20

Something else I learned in the book is that

12:22

supermarket chains don't wanna work

12:23

with dozens of different organic farmers.

12:25

They'd rather work with one company that is big enough

12:28

to offer a complete line of fruits and vegetables

12:30

every SKU in the produce section.

12:33

Which means not only are small farms

12:35

having trouble finding buyers,

12:36

but also that it becomes more difficult for consumers

12:39

to find and buy quality food.

12:41

I think the positive thing though is that more consumers are

12:44

starting to recognize the lie of big organic.

12:46

And this is why the people who have the means are

12:49

more attracted to farmer's markets and grocery stores

12:51

like Erewhon which is a certified B Corp,

12:54

a certification meaning that

12:55

the company is ethical and sustainable.

12:57

However, I think I should mention

13:00

that large companies like Nespresso,

13:03

which I feel like at least

13:04

have a pretty large carbon footprint from their coffee pods

13:08

achieved the certification

13:10

which makes me question how rigorous the review process is.

13:13

But whether or not Erewhon is

13:14

as sustainable as they market themselves to be,

13:17

I'm still waiting for an Erewhon a tell-all documentary.

13:23

People believe it and they're willing to pay for it.

13:25

Also, there's been a growing concern

13:27

over health and wellness in the culture in general.

13:29

McKinsey's latest future of wellness research

13:31

found that zoomers and millennials are purchasing

13:33

more wellness products and services

13:34

than older generations across the US, China, and the UK.

13:38

Ballooning into an industry valued at $23.5 billion in 2023.

13:43

In terms of the food side of

13:44

the health and wellness category,

13:45

American consumers are buying more superfoods

13:48

investing in probiotic foods to improve their gut health

13:50

and approximately 28% of Americans are consuming

13:54

more protein than before.

13:55

A lot of this interest probably has to do with

13:57

having more access to information,

13:58

and then of course social media,

14:00

and the consequent focus on

14:02

appearance and desire for community.

14:04

I'm sure a good number of people

14:05

bought the Hailey Bieber Erewhon smoothies

14:07

for the sole purpose of being able to take part in a trend.

14:10

Me included, I'm not better than anyone else.

14:13

And my honest review is that

14:16

the smoothie was too sweet for my taste,

14:18

but Erewhon's non-celebrity affiliated mango smoothie,

14:22

which I can't remember the name of,

14:23

I tried that the last time I was in LA

14:25

and it was quite good.

14:26

Another reason is potentially COVID-19

14:28

and how it made us all consider

14:29

our health and wellness more seriously.

14:31

(gentle music)

14:37

(keyboard clacking)

14:38

Since the pandemic, I'd say,

14:39

we've seen the rise of a certain type of influencer,

14:43

the chefluencer,

14:45

AKA an influencer who makes cooking videos for social media

14:48

and who may or may not be working as an actual chef.

14:50

I would that the social media interest in chefs

14:52

mostly stem from pandemic cooking content

14:55

in which more people were at home

14:56

and either wanted to learn to cook to avoid eating out

15:00

or experimented in the kitchen to pass the time.

15:03

This meant that there were more people

15:05

wanting to make cooking content.

15:06

- [Narrator] Prep with me

15:07

for my client's 16-person dinner party.

15:09

- Here's the green onion.

15:11

- [Narrator] Thyme, garlic, and a little bit of butter

15:12

to base the steak.

15:13

- But also more people wanting to consume said content.

15:17

But we also have to talk about Jeremy Allen White

15:19

whose consistent placement on

15:20

the white boy of the month charts probably helped.

15:23

White has been in Hollywood for a bit of time now,

15:26

but his role as sexy chef Carmy in The Bear

15:29

catapulted him into the spotlight