Is Caviar a scam?

Ethan Chlebowski
15 Mar 202428:21

Summary

TLDRThe video explores the world of caviar, questioning its worth and popularity due to its luxury status. The host blind-tastes six varieties of fish eggs at different price points, ranging from $10 to $250 for 30g, to determine if taste differences justify the price. Historically, caviar was a common food in Russia but became a luxury globally due to overfishing and farming challenges. The video concludes that while caviar is an interesting experience, its high cost is not justified by taste alone, suggesting lower-priced options as a starting point for the curious.

Takeaways

  • 💥 Caviar, one of the world's most expensive foods, can cost up to $400 for just 30g, raising questions about its value beyond luxury status.
  • 🐟 The variety in caviar prices is vast, ranging from $10 for white fish caviar to $250 for beluga hybrid caviar, showcasing a wide market spectrum.
  • 📜 Caviar's taste profile is subtly different across varieties, suggesting that its high cost may be more about rarity and production challenges than distinct flavors.
  • 📈 Historically, caviar was a common food, with a notable shift from being freely offered in bars in the U.S. to becoming a luxury item priced at tens of thousands of dollars per kilogram.
  • 🦑 The sturgeon, source of true caviar, is a slow-growing, long-living fish, contributing to the scarcity and high cost of caviar due to its late maturity and extensive lifespan.
  • 🛡️ Modern caviar production is entirely farm-based, aiming for sustainability and conservation, moving away from the overfishing that threatened sturgeon populations.
  • 🐧 Differences in caviar can be attributed to the species of sturgeon and the grade of the caviar, though grading standards appear to be non-uniform across producers.
  • 🛠 The process of making caviar is meticulous and labor-intensive, involving careful selection and preservation of the eggs, which justifies some of the cost.
  • 🔥 The taste test revealed that while there are perceptible differences in flavor, texture, and salinity among caviars, the distinctions may not justify the vast price differences.
  • 💰 For those curious about caviar, starting with lower-cost varieties offers a similar experience without the hefty price tag, suggesting luxury doesn't always equate to a vastly superior taste.

Q & A

  • What is the primary factor contributing to the high cost of caviar?

    -The high cost of caviar is primarily due to the expensive production process, which involves the slow growth and late maturation of sturgeon fish, the time and labor-intensive harvesting and processing of eggs, and the limited supply caused by the slow reproduction cycle of the fish.

  • How does the taste of caviar differ from other foods?

    -Caviar is known for its salty and umami flavors, which come from the high fat content and the amino acids present in the fish eggs. It also has a unique texture where the eggs burst in the mouth, releasing their flavors.

  • What historical event led to the popularity of caviar in the United States?

    -In the late 1800s, there was a 'Caviar Gold Rush' in the United States, where caviar was so popular and abundant that it was offered as a free appetizer in bars to encourage drinking.

  • Why did caviar transition from a common food to a luxury item?

    -Caviar's transition from a common food to a luxury item is attributed to its increasing popularity and trade, which led to overfishing and a decline in sturgeon populations, making it scarce and thus more valuable.

  • What are the different types of sturgeon caviar mentioned in the script?

    -The script mentions American white, baia, osetra, and beluga hybrid as different types of sturgeon caviar.

  • How did the host of the video approach the blind taste test of caviar?

    -The host approached the blind taste test by trying different varieties of caviar, including the most expensive and the least expensive options, as well as a mix of sturgeon and non-sturgeon fish eggs, to determine if the taste differences justified the price variations.

  • What is the role of the United Nations in the global caviar trade?

    -In 2006, the United Nations banned the global trade of wild-caught caviar to protect the critically endangered sturgeon species, leading to the prevalence of farmed caviar in the market.

  • What are the main factors that contribute to the grading and pricing of caviar?

    -The grading and pricing of caviar are based on the species of sturgeon, the size, firmness, color, and flavor of the eggs, as well as the quality control processes involved in harvesting and processing the eggs.

  • What was the host's conclusion about the worth of caviar after the taste test?

    -The host concluded that caviar is not worth its high price, as the taste differences between various types of caviar are subtle and largely a matter of personal preference.

  • How did the host describe the experience of eating caviar?

    -The host described the experience of eating caviar as unique, with a textural experience where the eggs burst in the mouth, and a taste that is primarily salty and umami.

  • What alternative types of caviar did the host taste, and what were his thoughts on them?

    -The host tasted white fish caviar and salmon caviar as alternatives to sturgeon caviar. He found the salmon caviar to have a unique textural experience due to its larger eggs, and he noted that while they were interesting, they were significantly different from sturgeon caviar.

Outlines

00:00

🥄 Introduction to Caviar: Luxury and Skepticism

The video begins with an exploration of caviar, one of the world's most expensive foods, costing upwards of $400 for 30 grams. The creator expresses skepticism about whether caviar's high price is justified or if its popularity is due to its status as a luxury product. To investigate, six different fish egg varieties were purchased at various price points, ranging from white fish caviar at $10 to a beluga hybrid caviar at $250 for 30 grams. The aim is to understand the taste differences between cheap and expensive caviar and to delve into the history and reasons behind caviar's high cost and global popularity.

05:00

📚 Historical Context and the Caviar Gold Rush

The paragraph delves into the history of caviar, noting that it was once a food for everyday people in Russia. It highlights the late 1800s 'Caviar Gold Rush' in the United States, where caviar was so abundant it was offered free in bars to encourage drinking. The contrast is made with today's prices, where the most expensive caviar can reach $100,000 per kilogram. The discussion then turns to the sturgeon, the source of true caviar, and the story of a sponsor, Headspace, is briefly interjected before returning to the topic of caviar's production and the factors contributing to its expense.

10:02

🐟 The Sturgeon Species and Caviar Production

This section focuses on the sturgeon fish, which is central to caviar's high cost. Sturgeon are slow-growing and late maturing, living up to 60 years and taking 7 to 15 years to start producing eggs. The large size of sturgeon and their few predators are noted, with examples of their impressive sizes provided. The paragraph then explains that all current caviar on the market comes from farmed sturgeon due to a 2006 UN ban on wild-caught caviar, emphasizing the shift to sustainable aquaculture methods. The history of how fish eggs became a popular global delicacy is explored, from their nutrient density to their cultural significance, particularly in Persia and Russia.

15:03

🌍 Global Popularity and the Impact of Overfishing

The paragraph discusses how caviar's popularity grew globally and how it led to overfishing, causing sturgeon populations to plummet. The high demand for caviar and its increasing price are documented, with a quote from a 1970 New York Times article highlighting the price surge. The discussion concludes with the effects of overfishing, which led to the endangerment of sturgeon species and the eventual UN ban on wild caviar, ushering in the era of farmed caviar. The video creator's purchased caviar varieties are revisited, setting the stage for a blind taste test to determine if caviar's taste justifies its price.

20:06

💰 Production Process and Grading of Caviar

The paragraph explains the modern process of making caviar, from the capture and stunning of the female sturgeon to the harvesting of the eggs. It details the labor-intensive and meticulous nature of cleaning and salting the eggs, as well as the grading process based on size, firmness, color, and flavor. The challenges of farming sturgeon, including infrastructure costs, difficulty in determining the sex of the fish, and the long wait for egg production, are outlined. The paragraph also discusses the lack of standardized grading regulations in the caviar industry, leading to significant price differences based on the species of sturgeon and the grade of caviar.

25:07

🍽️ Taste Test: Determining Caviar's Worth

The creator conducts a series of taste tests to evaluate the differences between various types of caviar. The tests involve comparing the most expensive caviar, the least expensive, and a triangle test to discern if there's a noticeable difference between low-cost and high-cost options. The experience of eating caviar is described, focusing on its unique texture and the expected salty and umami flavors. The tests reveal subtle differences in taste and aroma, largely based on personal preference, and a notable textural difference between salmon and sturgeon caviar. The conclusion drawn from the taste tests is that the high cost of caviar is not justified by its taste alone, suggesting that the experience and cultural associations are what drive its luxury status.

🍽️ Final Thoughts on Caviar's Value

In the conclusion, the creator reflects on the value of caviar, stating that it is an interesting food but not one that warrants its high cost. The experience of tasting various cavars is appreciated, but the creator expresses no desire to purchase more or seek out high-end caviar services. The video wraps up with the creator's recommendation to try lower-cost sturgeon caviar for those curious about caviar's taste, and a comparison of caviar to other luxury foods, where caviar ranks below options like wagyu steak, traditional balsamic vinegar, and fresh truffles in terms of justifying its price.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Caviar

Caviar refers to the processed, salted eggs of sturgeon or other fish species. It is considered a delicacy and is known for its unique texture and flavor profile, which includes saltiness and umami. In the video, the author explores the high cost of caviar, its taste, and the factors contributing to its status as a luxury food item.

💡Luxury Food

A luxury food is an expensive and indulgent item that is often associated with high quality and exclusivity. Caviar is presented as a luxury food in the video, with discussions on its price range, from affordable options to the extremely costly varieties.

💡Sturgeon

Sturgeon is a type of fish that produces the eggs used to make caviar. These fish are characterized by their slow growth, late maturation, and long lifespans. The scarcity and difficulty in producing eggs contribute to the high cost of sturgeon caviar.

💡Aquaculture

Aquaculture refers to the farming of aquatic organisms, such as fish and crustaceans, in controlled environments. In the context of the video, aquaculture is used to farm sturgeon for the production of caviar, as wild sturgeon caviar is banned due to conservation concerns.

💡Taste Test

A taste test is a method of evaluating food products by comparing their flavors, textures, and overall sensory experiences. In the video, the author conducts taste tests to determine if the high price of caviar is justified by its taste when compared to less expensive alternatives.

💡Sustainability

Sustainability in the context of food production refers to practices that ensure the long-term viability of resources and ecosystems. The video highlights the importance of sustainability in caviar production, particularly through aquaculture, to protect sturgeon species from overfishing and extinction.

💡Umami

Umami is one of the five basic tastes, often described as a savory or meaty flavor. It is associated with the presence of certain amino acids, like glutamate, which are found in high concentrations in foods like caviar.

💡Food History

Food history refers to the study of how food and its preparation have changed over time, including the cultural, economic, and social factors that have influenced these changes. The video delves into the history of caviar, from being a common food in Russia to becoming a global luxury item.

💡Price Point

A price point refers to the specific price at which a product is sold. It is often used to indicate the level of quality or luxury associated with the product. In the video, the author examines different price points of caviar to understand the factors that contribute to its cost and whether the taste justifies the price.

💡Sensory Experience

Sensory experience encompasses the feelings and perceptions generated by the senses when encountering food, including taste, smell, sight, and texture. The video emphasizes the unique sensory experience of eating caviar, from its salty taste to its cool, smooth texture.

Highlights

Caviar is one of the most expensive foods in the world, with prices upwards of $400 for just 30 grams.

The video aims to determine if caviar is worth its high price or if its popularity is due to its status as a luxury product.

Six different fish egg varieties were purchased for the video, including white fish caviar at $10, salmon caviar at $13, and sturgeon caviar varieties ranging from $50 to $250.

Caviar's history shows it was once food for everyday people in Russia, and in the late 1800s, it was so abundant in the United States that it was offered for free in bars.

The most expensive caviar in the world can reach up to $100,000 per kilogram.

Caviar's popularity and price are linked to the sturgeon fish, which can live up to 60 years and take 7 to 15 years to start producing eggs.

Wild sturgeon caviar is banned globally due to overfishing, and today's caviar market consists of farmed sturgeon caviar.

Caviar processing is a delicate, hand-done process that involves meticulous quality control and contributes to its high cost.

There are no standardized regulations for grading caviar, leading to a variety of terms used by different companies to describe their products.

Caviar's flavor profile is primarily salty and umami, with subtle differences in taste, aroma, and texture between varieties.

The video includes a blind taste test of different caviar varieties, aiming to determine if the price differences are noticeable in taste.

The taste test results suggest that while there are differences in taste and texture among caviar varieties, the distinctions are subtle and largely a matter of personal preference.

The video concludes that caviar is an interesting food experience but its high cost is not justified, especially when compared to other luxury foods.

For those curious about caviar, the video recommends starting with lower-cost options to understand the taste, aroma, and texture without the high price tag.

The history of caviar has been marked by its transformation from a common food to a high-end delicacy, with its price and popularity fluctuating over centuries.

The video's host shares a personal anecdote about using the Headspace app to manage stress and become a better leader, suggesting it as a resource for those feeling overwhelmed.

Transcripts

00:00

in this video we're doing a deep dive

00:01

into the world of caviar which at

00:03

upwards of3 or $400 for just 30 G is

00:07

easily one of the most expensive Foods

00:09

in the world but I'm approaching this

00:11

video as a bit of a skeptic and asking

00:14

the question is caviar actually worth it

00:17

or is it just popular because of its

00:19

status as a luxury product so I bought

00:22

six different fish egg varieties at

00:24

drastically different price points white

00:27

fish caviar at just $10 salmon caviar at

00:30

$13 and then I bought four varieties of

00:32

sturgeon caviar American white at $50

00:35

baa at 77 osetra at $130 and a beluga

00:40

hybrid cavar all the way at $250 for

00:43

this little 30 G tint now we'll get into

00:46

blind tasting these shortly but first I

00:48

have some questions that we need to get

00:50

to the bottom of one what does caviar

00:53

even taste like for example does a cheap

00:55

caviar taste that much different than a

00:57

$250 one and what are the these

01:00

different types of caviar we have and

01:02

maybe Most Fascinating why is caviar so

01:05

expensive and how did it become popular

01:08

all over the world and that is the

01:10

question we are going to start with

01:12

because today caviar is known as this

01:14

high-end ritzy appetizer but over the

01:17

course of history that was not the case

01:20

in the early days of Russia it was food

01:22

for the everyday person and maybe even

01:24

more shocking in the late 1800s there

01:27

was what could be referred to as a

01:28

Caviar Gold Rush in the United States

01:31

where caviar was actually so popular and

01:33

abundant it was offered as a free

01:36

appetizer in bars to encourage drinking

01:39

which is much different than today where

01:41

the most expensive caviar in the world

01:43

can go for 30 to even up to

01:46

$100,000 for a kilogram of the stuff the

01:50

history of caviar has gone through so

01:52

many twists and turns over the past

01:53

sever hundred years and it all starts

01:55

with the sturgeon one of the longest

01:58

living and largest fish in the

02:02

world first I want to share a story

02:04

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02:06

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02:09

most inspired I've been when it comes to

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02:13

stressful as well we started a whole new

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of people who now depend on me and I'm

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just being pulled in so many different

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gaining Clarity on the work that I

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and thank you again for sponsoring this

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video now let's get back to learning why

03:22

these sturgeon fish eggs are so darn

03:25

expensive the sturgeon is the common

03:27

name for the 28 species of fish

03:29

belonging to the Aspen seridi family

03:31

which are recognizable for their

03:33

prehistoric looking physical

03:35

characteristics and for many centuries

03:37

the term caviar exclusively referred to

03:40

salted fish eggs from the sturgeon so

03:42

for purposes of this section we're going

03:44

to use the term cavar to specifically

03:46

refer to these loose fish eggs harvested

03:49

from the row of a female sturgeon now

03:52

fish row is technically the entire ovary

03:54

of a female fish including the mass of

03:57

eggs and in preparation for spawning

03:59

female fish will develop astonishing

04:01

numbers of fish eggs in their row and

04:04

this row forms into the coherent mass

04:06

that runs alongside the belly of the

04:08

fish for example a single salmon can

04:10

have around 20,000 pearl-shaped eggs

04:13

while a single sturgeon can have

04:14

anywhere from 400,000 to 2 million eggs

04:17

depending on the species age and body

04:20

size and today one of the ways that

04:22

caviar is differentiated is based on the

04:25

species of thuron that the fish eggs

04:27

come from for example baa osetra and

04:30

Beluga hybrid caviar that we'll be

04:32

tasting today are fish eggs from those

04:34

specific species of sturgeon and two

04:36

facts about sturgeon completely blew my

04:39

mind and begin to explain why caviar is

04:41

so expensive today first sturgeon are a

04:45

slow growing late maturing fish where

04:47

most species can live up to 60 years if

04:50

not even longer and typically the

04:52

females can take anywhere from 7 to 15

04:55

years before they even start producing

04:57

eggs secondly sturgeon are massive and

05:00

have very few Predators for example

05:03

according to the National Oceanic

05:04

Atmospheric Administration the five

05:06

Atlantic sturgeon species can grow up to

05:08

800 lb and 14 ft long what's even

05:12

crazier is that the largest single

05:15

Sturgeon caught on record was a female

05:18

beluga sturgeon caught in the vulga

05:19

delta in Russia in

05:21

1827 and this sturgeon measured in at 23

05:25

7 in and

05:28

3,463 pounds now these days of catching

05:32

wild surgeon for caviar are completely

05:35

gone as in 2006 the United Nations

05:38

actually banned the global trade of wild

05:40

caught caviar today basically all the

05:43

caviar on the market is from sturgeons

05:45

that were farmed through aquacultures

05:48

with sustainability and conservation in

05:50

mind now we'll take a look at how caviar

05:53

is produced on farms today in just a bit

05:55

but first let's do a crash course into

05:57

how these fish eggs became so popular

06:00

around the globe and to start it's worth

06:02

asking why did humans start eating fish

06:04

eggs in the first

06:06

place as noted in on food and cooking

06:09

because fish eggs contain all the

06:11

nutrients that one cell will need to

06:12

grow into a hatchling they're often a

06:14

more concentrated form of nourishment

06:16

than the fish itself with more fat and

06:18

large quantities of savory building

06:20

block amino acids and put simply humans

06:23

started eating fish eggs for the same

06:25

reason we started eating bird eggs as a

06:27

nutrient-dense protein source and you

06:29

can see they actually have similar

06:30

layers that we learned about in the

06:32

chicken egg video in fact many cultures

06:35

preserve the entire row Mass from

06:37

different types of fish and from on food

06:39

and cooking they have a whole table of

06:41

common fish eggs eaten around the world

06:43

now the Persians seem to have been the

06:46

first people to consume sturgeon eggs

06:48

from the Caspian Seas as there are

06:50

mentions of this as far back as the 4th

06:52

Century additionally the word caviar is

06:55

ultimately derived from the Persian word

06:57

caviar from Caya meaning egg however to

07:01

understand how it exists in its current

07:03

press form and how it became popular all

07:05

over the world we jump forward several

07:07

hundred years to Russia where caviar was

07:10

seen as kind of an innovation from the

07:12

cured row Sachs of the sturgeon as noted

07:14

in on food and cooking caviar appears to

07:16

have risen in Russia sometime around

07:18

1200 CE as a more palatable alternative

07:21

to the traditional preserved sturgeon

07:23

ovaries and in Russia wild surgeon were

07:25

caught from these Caspian Seas where the

07:27

fish eggs were then harvested and the

07:29

most popular and well-known species of

07:31

sturgeon during this time and still

07:33

today was the

07:34

Beluga however instead of this very very

07:37

high- pric luxury caviar was likely a

07:40

normal part of the diet in most areas

07:42

with an abundant supply of sturgeon

07:44

however that soon changed just how many

07:47

foods develop reputations that favor

07:49

where they originated from such as

07:51

parmesan from Italy or soy sauce from

07:53

Japan Russia and the other countries

07:55

neighboring the Caspian and black Seas

07:58

became known for the original and

07:59

supposed top quality caviar that was

08:02

primarily from the surgeon in these

08:03

areas which yield large plump eggs so

08:07

over the next 6 to 700 years people

08:09

began getting a taste for these sturgeon

08:11

eggs which have been described as salty

08:13

Umami and will tantalize your tongue

08:15

with its little burst of flavor however

08:18

the more popular that caviar got the

08:21

more it was traded and transported the

08:23

more surgeon was fish for and the

08:25

population plummeted remember depending

08:29

on this species they can take 7 to 15

08:31

years to produce eggs and live for 50

08:33

years or more so while the population of

08:35

sturgeon was huge in the beginning since

08:37

they don't really have any Predators

08:39

other than humans every time a sturgeon

08:41

was caught it's going to take a couple

08:43

decades to recover which during the 13

08:46

to 1900s no one was really worried about

08:49

and towards the end of the 1800s there

08:51

became a shortage of caviar from the

08:53

sturgeon in the black and Caspian Seas

08:56

so fishing started to extend to other

08:58

sturgeon species around the world caviar

09:01

fishing operations popped up in China

09:03

Italy France Bulgaria the United States

09:06

and several other countries during this

09:08

time but then they quickly collapsed and

09:11

I think this story from the NOAA is

09:13

probably a pretty common one that

09:14

happened in most countries quote during

09:17

the late 1800s people flocked to the

09:19

Eastern United States in shts of caviar

09:21

riches from the surgeon fishery known as

09:24

the Black Gold Rush and by the beginning

09:26

of the 1900s sturgeon populations had

09:29

decline drastically close to 7 million

09:32

pounds of sturgeon were reportedly

09:33

caught in 1887 but by 1905 the catch

09:38

declined to only 20,000 lb and by 1989

09:42

only 400 lb of sturgeon were

09:46

recorded despite sturgeon becoming more

09:48

and more scarce people still wanted

09:50

caviar all throughout the 1900s and

09:52

would happily pay for it as the price

09:54

got higher and higher there's a great

09:57

quote documenting this rise in price

09:58

from a 19 1970 New York Times article

10:01

whereas 10 years ago those Pearls of

10:03

Caspian cost in the vicinity of $40 a

10:06

pound the price is now well past the $60

10:09

price level in some of the swankier

10:11

emporiums about town which if you adjust

10:14

that into today's price is around $480 a

10:17

pound now does caviar actually taste

10:19

good enough to Warrant those prices

10:21

we'll see shortly eventually though all

10:24

this over fishing did come to a head

10:26

with every sturgeon species becoming

10:28

critically endanged DED and facing

10:30

extinction and this is what led to the

10:32

un's 2006 Global ban which effectively

10:36

ended wild cot caviar and ushered us

10:39

into the modern-day Farm caviar that we

10:41

have available today as a reminder these

10:44

are the four sturgeon caviar that I

10:46

purchased for tasting in this video

10:48

which were all farmed in various

10:50

countries with different types of

10:51

sturgeon and additionally we'll be

10:53

tasting eggs from salmon and white fish

10:55

too which made me wonder two things one

10:58

why are there such big price differences

11:00

between them and secondly do they

11:02

actually taste different so let's

11:04

quickly cover how is caviar made and

11:06

process today and what is the flavor of

11:09

caviar then it will be time for us to

11:11

evaluate these in a blind taste test and

11:13

answer the question is caviar actually

11:16

worth it so now that sturgeon Farms are

11:18

popping up all over the world you may

11:20

think that caviar prices will start to

11:22

come down however even with advances in

11:25

aquaculture engineering sturgeon fish

11:27

eggs will likely remain a luxury product

11:30

due to several variables first there is

11:33

a high infrastructure cost of the large

11:34

tanks feeding and filtering all on the

11:37

farms secondly sturgeons are hard to sex

11:40

they have to be around 5 years old

11:42

before a farm might be confident if a

11:43

fish is male or female and because of

11:46

this you're spending money on male

11:48

sturgeon which don't exactly Drive much

11:50

profit third once they are sexed the

11:53

female surgeons still take a long time

11:55

before they are ready to produce those

11:57

eggs and many farms will start checking

11:59

the surgeon at around 7 years for a

12:01

potential Harvest but depending on the

12:03

fish it could be 15 or 20 years and

12:06

fourthly there is a tight window to

12:08

actually harvest the eggs at their Peak

12:11

ripeness so after years of waiting and

12:13

finding the perfect time and keeping a

12:15

sturgeon stress-free only then will a

12:17

farm be ready to harvest the row but

12:20

this is just half of the caviar process

12:23

that row must be turned into the

12:25

individual eggs for human consumption

12:27

and is another reason why cavar is still

12:29

so expensive today caviar processing is

12:32

delicate tedious done by hand and the

12:35

quality control is meticulous and here's

12:37

an overview of how this process works so

12:40

how is caviar made today well first the

12:42

female surgeon is captured and stunned

12:44

secondly the row is then removed from

12:46

the fish and typically will be killed

12:48

and butchered but there has been some

12:51

experimentation with modern methods that

12:53

can keep the fish alive third the row is

12:56

then passed through a series of screens

12:57

to loosen and separate the egg from each

12:59

other and this step also filters out the

13:01

actual ovaries and any membranes in the

13:03

row sack however before going any

13:06

further forth the caviar workers must

13:08

carefully clean up the loose eggs by

13:10

hand this includes individually picking

13:12

out damaged or spoiled eggs any of the

13:15

remaining row membranes and anything

13:16

else that may have made it through the

13:18

sifting screen process so this is very

13:20

time intensive and detailed fifth the

13:23

loose eggs are then mixed with salt

13:25

until they reach a specific

13:26

concentration and for caviar this is

13:28

usually between between 3 to 10% salt

13:32

six The Salted eggs are drained of that

13:33

excess liquid and before tinning they

13:35

are checked one last time for quality

13:38

control being meticulously parsed over

13:40

and graded before packaging then finally

13:43

The Salted eggs get into the can tins

13:45

and are preserved at below zero

13:47

temperatures but they don't solidify

13:48

since their salt levels lower the

13:50

freezing point and finally The Salted

13:52

eggs are then loaded into the tins that

13:54

we can find at the grocery store

13:56

available to buy and today the five

13:59

biggest exporters of caviar ranked by

14:01

ship weight are China Poland the United

14:03

States Italy and Uganda so as a

14:05

potential buyer of cavar you may be

14:07

wondering how do you even choose what

14:09

caviar to buy and why are there big

14:12

price differences between them

14:14

ultimately caviar is a product of supply

14:16

and demand but it seems that there are

14:18

two variables you need to choose from if

14:20

you are picking out caviar for yourself

14:22

first is the sturgeon species and

14:25

secondly is the grade of the

14:27

caviar so if you go to almost any caviar

14:30

website they will have their caviar

14:32

listed by the species of sturgeon which

14:34

jumps it into a certain price range in

14:36

my case the Bika sturgeon was the least

14:38

expensive the osetra was in the middle

14:40

and the Beluga hybrid was the most

14:42

expensive however the same sturgeon can

14:45

produce different grades of caviar for

14:47

example here the osetra caviar can range

14:50

from

14:50

$129 all the way up to $49 for that same

14:55

size 30 G tin and this is kind of just

14:58

insane and may make you wonder well how

15:00

is caviar graded and it seems to be

15:03

determined by multiple characteristics

15:05

such as the size firmness color and

15:07

flavor of the fish eggs however this is

15:10

where in our research there seems to be

15:12

a big problem as far as we could find

15:15

there are not standardized regulations

15:16

when it comes to grading caviar for

15:19

example if you go to a website or find

15:20

some in the store you'll see terms like

15:22

select Reserve Golden Reserve Royal

15:24

president or imperial but it seems like

15:26

all these terms are up to the individual

15:28

company compes that are processing the

15:30

caviar in the case of pasture raise eggs

15:32

or certain types of meat there are whole

15:34

documents outlining the specific

15:36

standards that these products must go

15:38

through and you have a much clearer

15:39

picture of why they cost a lot more with