Replay! SpaceX Starship launches on 3rd integrated test flight

VideoFromSpace
14 Mar 202443:01

Summary

TLDRSpaceX's Starship, the world's most powerful launch vehicle, successfully completes its third flight test, demonstrating controlled ascent, hot stage separation, and orbital insertion. The mission aims to gather valuable data to inform the design and development of Starship for future space missions, including landing on the moon and Mars. Despite a nominal ascent and successful engine shutdown, the booster experiences an unscheduled disassembly during the landing burn, providing learning opportunities for SpaceX's rapid reusability goals.

Takeaways

  • 🚀 Starship is the world's most powerful launch vehicle and represents the largest flying object ever made.
  • 📈 The test aims to surpass achievements from the previous flight test conducted in November of the previous year.
  • 🌟 Starship's design goal is to be fully and rapidly reusable, which is critical for future space missions including those to Mars.
  • 🔥 The last integrated flight test (Flight 2) saw all 33 Raptor engines on the Super Heavy booster start successfully and complete a full-duration burn during ascent.
  • 🛰️ Starship executed a successful hot stage separation and ignited its second-stage Raptor engines for the first time with a vehicle of its size.
  • 🌊 The Super Heavy booster in Flight 2 performed a flip maneuver and initiated a boost back burn, but experienced a rapid unscheduled disassembly due to a filter blockage issue.
  • 🌐 For Flight 3, Starship will attempt to splash down in the Indian Ocean, testing capabilities needed for future missions while maximizing public safety.
  • 🚀 The test profile for Flight 3 is similar to Flight 2 but with a major difference: Starship will attempt to relight a Raptor engine in space for the first time.
  • 🌙 Starship's rapid reusability is key for future missions to the moon and beyond, and the data gathered from each test flight informs the design and improvement of the vehicle.
  • 🎯 The primary goal of Flight 3 is to collect as much data as possible to continue iterating and improving Starship for future operational flights.

Q & A

  • What is the primary goal of the Starship's third flight test?

    -The primary goal of the Starship's third flight test is to gather as much data as possible to help improve the vehicle and its systems for future missions, including testing the first-ever relight of a Raptor engine in space and attempting a splashdown in the Indian Ocean.

  • How does the Starship's design compare to the Saturn 5 rocket in terms of thrust?

    -Starship has more than twice the thrust of the Saturn 5 rocket. With planned future upgrades, it will have three times the thrust.

  • What is the significance of the hot staging maneuver performed during the flight test?

    -The hot staging maneuver is significant because it is a critical technique for reusable space transportation systems. It involves shutting down most of the booster's engines and igniting the ship's engines while still attached to the partially lit booster, allowing for stage separation and maximizing performance.

  • What is the purpose of the Starship's heat shield?

    -The heat shield, made up of 18,000 hexagonal ceramic tiles, is designed to insulate the vehicle during atmospheric entry, where temperatures can reach as high as 2,600 degrees Fahrenheit, protecting it from the intense heat generated during re-entry.

  • How does the Starship's first stage (super heavy booster) plan to return to Earth?

    -The first stage (super heavy booster) plans to return to Earth by performing a boost back burn to propel itself back towards the coast and then a landing burn to slow down before splashing down in the Gulf of Mexico.

  • What is the expected outcome for the Starship's second stage (the ship) after the engines shut down?

    -After the engines shut down, the Starship's second stage is expected to coast through space for about 30 minutes at altitudes between 150 and 235 km before attempting its first-ever relight of a Raptor engine in space.

  • What is the significance of the Starship's ability to carry heavy payloads?

    -The Starship's ability to carry heavy payloads, up to 250 metric tons to orbit with future engine upgrades, is crucial for missions to the Moon and Mars, as it allows for the transportation of large amounts of cargo and equipment necessary for establishing a self-sustaining city on Mars.

  • How does the Starship's vertical takeoff and landing (VTVL) capability aid in lunar and Mars missions?

    -The VTVL capability is essential for lunar and Mars missions because there are no runways on these celestial bodies. The ability to take off and land vertically on any hard surface enables precise landings and operations on the Moon and Mars.

  • What is the role of the ground support systems in enabling rapid reusability of the Starship?

    -The ground support systems are designed for rapid turnaround of the launchpad between flights. They help minimize post-launch rework and enable quick reflights, which is critical for achieving the goal of rapid reusability of the Starship.

  • What are some of the lessons learned from previous flight tests that have been implemented for the third flight test?

    -Lessons learned from previous flight tests include improvements to the filtration system in the oxygen tank to prevent filter blockage, better leak reduction and fire protection, and operational changes to increase reliability. These have been implemented in the Starship and its booster for the third flight test.

Outlines

00:00

🚀 Introduction to Starship and SpaceX's Mission

The script opens with a live view of Starship, the world's most powerful launch vehicle, at T plus 31 minutes and 24 seconds, awaiting its third flight test from Starbase Texas. The event is broadcast from SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, California. The excitement is palpable as the crowd anticipates the developmental flight test. The goal is to collect data to get closer to a fully operational Starship, designed for heavy payloads and human landings on the moon and Mars. The Starship's previous test achievements and the importance of its rapid reusability are highlighted.

05:00

🌟 Starship's Flight Test Profile and Goals

This paragraph details the flight test profile for Starship, including the attempt to splash down in the Indian Ocean, a steeper trajectory, and testing capabilities needed for future missions. The script explains the planned ignition of 33 Raptor engines, the hot stage separation, and the ship's engines relight in space. It also covers the booster's flip maneuver and the planned venting of excess propellant to simulate payload mass. The focus on public safety and the importance of data collection for the development of a reusable rocket system are emphasized.

10:00

🛰️ Starship's Design and Reusability

The third paragraph discusses Starship's design, including its size compared to the Saturn 5 rocket and the Statue of Liberty, and its capabilities for vertical takeoff and landing. The ship's Raptor engines, heat shield tiles, and the hot stage technique are explained. The paragraph also covers the importance of reusability for missions to the moon and Mars, the development of critical systems for propulsion and life support, and the preparation for a self-sustaining city on Mars.

15:01

🌙 Lunar and Mars Missions with Starship

This section focuses on the preparations for lunar and Mars missions, including the development of elevators for lunar surface access and the importance of the data gathered from test flights. It mentions the uncrewed demonstration flight before NASA's Artemis 3 mission and the plans for a moon base. The logistics of supporting a city on Mars and the iterative design process of SpaceX are also discussed, emphasizing the learnings from previous spacecraft like Dragon.

20:03

🔄 Rapid Reusability and Future Flight Tests

The script highlights SpaceX's goal of full and rapid reusability, with the aim of flying Starship stages with minimal downtime between flights. It discusses the ground systems being developed for rapid reusability and the production of multiple Starship vehicles for future flight tests. The importance of test flights in improving vehicle design and the iterative process of learning from failures are emphasized, with the anticipation of more ambitious goals for upcoming tests.

25:05

🚀 Final Countdown and Launch

The final preparations for launch are detailed, including the propellant loading sequences, the potential hold at T-minus 40 seconds due to winds, and the lack of technical issues. The script describes the launch pad readiness, the ignition sequence of the Raptor engines, and the anticipation of a successful liftoff. The excitement of the moment is palpable, with the expectation of a clear path to orbit and the collection of valuable data for future missions.

30:07

🌌 Starship in Orbit and Test Objectives

After a successful liftoff and ascent, Starship achieves orbit, marking a new milestone for the mission. The paragraph discusses the successful engine cut off, the ship's coast phase into space, and the planned ambitious test objectives ahead. It also mentions the loss of the booster during the landing burn, indicating a need for further analysis of the data. The focus is on the continuation of the mission to gather as much data as possible for the development of Starship.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Starship

Starship is the most powerful launch vehicle developed by SpaceX, designed for missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. It is fully reusable and has the capacity to carry heavy payloads. In the video, the anticipation and excitement around Starship's third flight test are central to the narrative.

💡Raptor engines

Raptor engines are the propulsion system used in SpaceX's Starship and Super Heavy booster. They provide the necessary thrust for liftoff, ascent, and maneuvering in space. The successful operation of these engines is critical to the flight test's objectives.

💡Flight test

A flight test is a controlled experiment conducted to evaluate and verify the performance of a spacecraft, its systems, and flight procedures. In the context of the video, the third flight test of Starship is aimed at gathering data, testing new technologies, and ensuring the vehicle's design and functionality meet the objectives for future missions.

💡Reusable rocket

A reusable rocket is a launch vehicle that can be used multiple times, reducing the cost of space travel by eliminating the need to build new rockets for each mission. SpaceX's Starship is designed to be fully and rapidly reusable, with the goal of reusing both the first and second stages of the vehicle.

💡Super Heavy booster

The Super Heavy booster is the first stage of the SpaceX Starship system, designed to provide the initial thrust for liftoff and ascent. It is equipped with multiple Raptor engines and is intended to return to Earth for a controlled splashdown after separating from the Starship.

💡Orbital insertion

Orbital insertion is the process of placing a spacecraft into orbit around a celestial body, such as Earth or the Moon. It involves precise maneuvers and engine burns to achieve the correct velocity and trajectory for stable orbit.

💡Hot staging

Hot staging is a technique used in rocketry where the upper stage of a launch vehicle ignites its engines while still attached to the lower stage. This allows for efficient transfer of momentum and reduces the need for additional propellant to perform the separation maneuver.

💡Telemetry

Telemetry refers to the transmission of data from a remote source, such as a spacecraft, to a receiving station on Earth. It is essential for monitoring the health, status, and performance of the vehicle during flight.

💡Heat shield

A heat shield is a protective layer designed to withstand and dissipate the extreme heat generated during atmospheric re-entry. For spacecraft like Starship, the heat shield is crucial for protecting the vehicle and its occupants from the high temperatures encountered when returning to Earth.

💡Lunar mission

A lunar mission refers to any space mission that involves traveling to the Moon. SpaceX's Starship is being developed to support crewed and uncrewed missions to the Moon, including NASA's Artemis program, which aims to return humans to the lunar surface.

Highlights

Starship is the world's most powerful launch vehicle and the largest flying object ever made.

The third flight test of Starship is taking place from Starbase Texas, also known as the 'gateway to Mars'.

The goal of the flight test is to collect as much data as possible to help develop a fully operational Starship.

Starship is designed to be a fully rapidly reusable and reliable rocket, with the aim of flying the heaviest payloads ever.

The latest Starship vehicle has more than twice the thrust of the Saturn 5 rocket, which took astronauts to the Moon.

The previous flight test saw all 33 Raptor engines on the Super Heavy booster start up successfully and complete a full-duration burn during ascent.

Starship executed a successful hot stage separation and ignited the second stage Raptor engines for the first time.

The Super Heavy booster performed a flip maneuver and initiated the boost back burn, experiencing a rapid unscheduled disassembly due to a filter blockage.

The second stage Raptor engines started successfully at separation, but a leak developed causing fires and engine shutdown.

The new water-cooled flame deflector and pad upgrades performed as expected, requiring minimal post-launch rework.

Today's test will see Starship attempt to splash down in the Indian Ocean, testing capabilities needed for future missions.

The test profile includes a hot stage separation, coast phase, and an attempt to fire a single Raptor engine in space for the first time.

The Super Heavy booster will attempt a landing burn before splashing down into the Gulf of Mexico.

Starship's rapid reusability is key for future missions to the Moon and Mars, and the telemetry data received is crucial for development.

The primary goal of flight three is to attempt to transfer several tons of propellant between tanks inside Starship and relight a Raptor engine in space.

The ability to refill Starships in orbit is critical for landing on the Moon and enabling deep space exploration.

Starship's heat shield will be tested during re-entry, with data on temperatures and shield performance being collected.

The countdown for the launch is progressing smoothly, with no technical issues reported.

The launch will take place at 8:25 AM Central Time, with a focus on rapid reusability for future spaceflight.

Transcripts

00:00

hello and good morning you're looking at

00:02

a live view of Starship the world's most

00:04

powerful launch vehicle and by far the

00:07

biggest flying object ever made we're

00:09

currently at t plus 31 minutes and 24

00:13

seconds awaiting our third flight test

00:15

of Starship from Starbase Texas or what

00:18

we here at SpaceX like to call the

00:20

gateway to Mars thanks for tuning in

00:23

we're excited to be joining you from

00:24

SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne

00:26

California now it's just been a

00:28

hundred

00:30

you can tell the crowd is already

00:32

excited behind us now it's only been 117

00:36

days since our last Starship test and

00:38

for those of you following along you'll

00:40

know there's nothing more exciting as

00:42

you can hear than to watch a de

00:44

developmental flight test that's

00:46

absolutely right flight test St

00:48

guarantee the maximum level of

00:50

excitement as you can hear behind us and

00:52

if it all goes well Starship will lift

00:55

off just about 30 minutes from now we're

00:58

hoping to surpass what we achieved in

01:00

flight test number two back in November

01:02

of last year but regardless of today's

01:05

outcome the goal is to collect as much

01:07

data as possible and that'll help us get

01:10

one step closer to a fully operational

01:12

Starship now Starship which you see on

01:14

your screen is the latest and largest

01:16

vehicle developed to date by SpaceX and

01:19

in the world ever compared to Saturn 5

01:22

the rocket that first took astronauts to

01:24

the Moon Starship has more than twice

01:26

the thrust and with some upgrades that

01:28

are planned for the future it'll have

01:30

three times the thrust Starship will

01:33

allow us to fly the heaviest payloads

01:35

ever flown land humans on the moon again

01:38

after more than a half century and

01:40

ultimately fly humans further into space

01:42

than ever before even to Mars but the

01:45

most important thing about Starship is

01:46

that it's designed to be a fully rapidly

01:49

reusable reliable rocket or what we like

01:51

to call the four RS and we'll talk more

01:53

about those later in the webcast but

01:56

before we dive into the details of

01:58

today's test let's recap the

02:00

achievements of our last integrated

02:01

flight test flight

02:03

two all 33 Raptor engines on the super

02:06

heavy booster started up successfully

02:09

and for the first time completed a full

02:11

duration burn during Ascent as you can

02:14

see here we saw amazing views of each

02:16

Raptor engine burning during that Ascent

02:18

which is something awesome because we

02:19

don't get to see that with Falcon and

02:21

its Merlin engines now next Starship

02:24

executed a successful hot stage

02:26

separation powering down all but three

02:28

of super heavy Raptor engines and

02:30

successfully igniting the six second

02:32

stage Raptor engines before the vehicle

02:34

separated this is the first time this

02:36

technique has been done successfully

02:38

with a vehicle of this size and scale

02:41

following separation the super heavy

02:43

booster successfully performed its flip

02:45

maneuver and initiated the Boost back

02:47

burn however about 30 seconds into that

02:51

burn it experienced a rapid unscheduled

02:53

disassembly or rud that SpaceX speak for

02:56

an exciting end to the booster's journey

02:59

the likely cause was determined to be

03:00

filter blockage where liquid oxygen is

03:02

supplied to the engines so we've

03:05

upgraded Hardware inside the oxygen tank

03:07

to improve filtration capabilities in

03:09

our boosters including the one that's

03:11

out on the pad today vehicle breakup

03:13

occurred more than three and a half

03:15

minutes into the FL into the flight

03:16

about 90 kilometers over the Gulf of

03:18

Mexico so well away from people now on

03:21

Starship the six second stage Raptor

03:24

engines all started successfully at

03:26

separation and everything was going

03:28

normally in the ship's climbed space

03:30

until about 7 minutes into the flight

03:32

when we began a planned vent of excess

03:34

liquid oxygen propellant to simulate the

03:37

mass of a payload and get future Focus

03:39

data the ship was loaded with extra

03:41

propellant that we needed to get rid of

03:42

or vent before re-entry once we started

03:46

venting though a leak developed that

03:48

caused fires which eventually cut the

03:49

connection between the flight computers

03:51

on the ship and that caused the six

03:54

Raptor engines to shut down before we

03:55

had finished the full burn that was

03:58

detected by as a mission violation by

04:00

the autonomous flight safety system

04:02

which triggered a the flight termination

04:04

system and led to vehicle breakup

04:07

starship's second flight test nearly

04:09

completed its full duration burn it

04:11

ended at an altitude of about 150

04:14

kilometers and a velocity of 24,000

04:17

kilometers per hour officially making it

04:19

the first Starship to reach outer space

04:22

like the booster we've made upgrades to

04:23

starship's Upper stage based on flight 2

04:25

learning such as improved leak reduction

04:28

fire protection and changing the

04:30

operations to increase reliability now

04:33

back at the launch site the new water

04:34

cooled flame deflector and other pad

04:37

upgrades performed as expected so the

04:39

pad required minimal post-launch rework

04:41

and that's a big reason why why we are

04:44

ready to fly again today the ground

04:46

support systems are designed for Rapid

04:48

turnaround of the Launchpad between

04:50

flights and the improvements we've made

04:51

ahead of flight three are getting us

04:53

closer to that goal and that brings us

04:55

to today's test the test profile and the

04:58

burn timeline are very similar to test

05:00

number two with one major difference the

05:02

ship will attempt to splash down in the

05:04

Indian Ocean rather than the Pacific

05:07

this puts us on a steeper trajectory

05:09

than past flights and lets us taste cap

05:11

test capabilities that we'll need for

05:13

the future like lighting a raptor in

05:16

space while maximizing Public Safety so

05:19

let's take a closer look at the flight

05:21

test profile now about 26 minutes from

05:24

now super heavy will ignite its 33

05:26

Raptor engines and lift off from

05:28

Starbase about 3 minutes into the flight

05:30

super Heavy's booster will separate from

05:32

the ship in spacex's second ever attempt

05:35

at a hot stage separation that means

05:37

it'll light its engines while still

05:38

attached to a partially lit booster the

05:41

ship's engines will then remain lit for

05:42

about 6 minutes during the ascent before

05:44

entering a coast phase next the booster

05:47

will perform a flip maneuver and execute

05:49

a boost back burn which if you recall is

05:51

where flight two super heavy experience

05:53

a rapid unscheduled disassembly we're

05:55

hoping Hardware upgrades made for this

05:56

flight will get the booster closer to

05:58

executing a landing burn in the Gulf of

06:00

Mexico in the meantime Starship will

06:02

Coast for about 30 minutes at altitudes

06:04

between 150 and 235 km and the ship will

06:08

attempt to fire a single Raptor engine

06:10

for our first ever relight of a Raptor

06:12

engine in space and from there the ship

06:14

will head toward its destination a

06:17

splash down location in the Indian Ocean

06:20

again if we get past a successful stage

06:23

separation and a full Ascent burn with

06:26

the upper stage it will be at an at

06:29

altitude and trajectory below orbital

06:31

meaning Starship won't have to fire its

06:33

Raptor engines for a deorbit burn and it

06:36

will naturally come back into the

06:37

atmosphere no matter what now meanwhile

06:40

the super heavy is going to attempt a

06:42

landing burn before splashing down into

06:44

the Gulf and while we are going to

06:46

practice a landing we aren't planning to

06:48

recover any of the hardware from super

06:50

heavy or the ship on this flight now

06:52

with the exception of Falcon this is no

06:54

different from what happens with most

06:55

Rockets flying today that are expended

06:58

or fall into the ocean after they

07:00

complete their mission eventually though

07:02

we will land and recover Starship

07:03

boosters and ships just as we do with

07:06

Falcon 9 and heavy boosters where we've

07:08

recovered 283 to date starship's rapid

07:11

reusability is key as we begin missions

07:15

to the moon and Beyond even though

07:17

recovery is not planned the Telemetry

07:19

and data we receive all the way to the

07:21

end is what we're looking for

07:23

particularly with regard to the ship's

07:25

temperatures during re-entry and how the

07:27

heat shield will perform the data that

07:29

we gather today of course will help us

07:31

continue to build a rapidly reusable

07:33

Starship for the future now much like

07:36

our first two flight tests today also

07:40

still just a test our goal is to gather

07:42

data to continue iterating and

07:44

ultimately uh improve Starship that's

07:47

exactly right the primary goal for

07:48

flight one was to clear the pad and we

07:51

did that and got a lot of great data

07:53

that helped us improve the vehicle and

07:55

the pad infrastructure that you see

07:56

today the primary goal of Flight 2 was

07:58

to get all the way to Stage separation

08:00

which we did and even got a little extra

08:02

for flight three we've added some

08:04

ambitious tests highlighted by an

08:06

attempt to transfer several tons of

08:08

propellent between the tanks inside

08:10

Starship itself as well as the first

08:12

ever relight of a Raptor engine in space

08:15

and the opening and closing of

08:17

starship's payload door when Starship

08:19

takes astronauts to the lunar surface as

08:21

part of NASA's emis program it will be

08:24

refilled in Space by a Starship tanker

08:26

spacecraft before boosting itself into a

08:28

lunar orbit

08:29

like you see here transferring a large

08:31

amount of cryogenic liquid in space has

08:34

never been done by anyone ever so uh

08:38

we'll be looking to get data on some of

08:39

the fundamental physics in play here

08:41

like managing pressures temperatures uh

08:44

propellant settling um all as we prepare

08:46

for eventual ship-to ship transfers the

08:49

ability to refill Starships once in

08:51

orbit will be critical for landing on

08:53

the moon and is a key technology for

08:56

enabling deep space exploration and

08:58

ultimately flights to Mars now we're

09:00

also attempting the first ever relight

09:02

of a Raptor engine in space and we'll

09:04

need that capability for future in space

09:07

Maneuvers and deorbit burns it's

09:09

important to note that what we'll

09:10

attempt today is not a burn required for

09:13

Starship to reenter on today's test we

09:15

are intentionally flying this new

09:17

steeper trajectory so we can test things

09:20

like engine relights without

09:21

substantially changing where we expect

09:23

to splash down and if Starship manages

09:26

to make it all the way to re-entry we

09:28

will collect that valuable data on the

09:30

vehicle as it flies through the Earth's

09:32

atmosphere at Hypersonic speeds or more

09:35

than five times the speed of sound we

09:38

expect it to look something like this

09:39

animation on your screen with the heat

09:41

shield tiles facing down we'll use the

09:44

Earth's atmosphere to break the vehicle

09:47

and help then get us into a controllable

09:50

regime as we go towards Splashdown and

09:53

we did validate starship's ability to

09:55

fly in land at subsonic speeds during

09:57

our suborbital flights several years ago

10:00

and Gathering data on the aspects like

10:02

Heating and vehicle control while we're

10:05

traveling way faster will become

10:07

critical to eventually bringing

10:09

Starships back from space for Rapid

10:11

reuse we'll also attempt to open and

10:13

close starship's payload door for the

10:15

very first time a capability that we'll

10:17

need when Starship starts flying our

10:19

next Generation starlink satellites and

10:22

there you can see an animation of what

10:24

that will look like as the satellites

10:25

are deployed one by one through a slot

10:28

near the top of the space C so at this

10:30

point in time we are approaching T-minus

10:32

21 minutes until liftoff let's check in

10:35

with Dan for a countdown

10:40

update hey thanks Kate hey everybody I'm

10:42

Dan hu good morning welcome to Starbase

10:45

I'm coming to you from the Raptor's Nest

10:47

where I'm here with some of our flight

10:48

controllers also our pad red team uh

10:51

we're just behind the mega Bay those are

10:53

super heavy boosters right behind me

10:55

getting ready for the next four flights

10:57

after this one uh so we're looking to

10:59

lach a lot this year uh countdown has

11:01

been pretty clean so far we're not

11:03

tracking any issues that are gating us

11:05

on the hardware side and the vehicle

11:07

side from that on time liftoff at 8:25

11:10

a.m. Central Time that's our t0 right

11:12

now we primarily shifted later as we

11:15

were just working to clear the range uh

11:17

the other big watch item today is going

11:20

to be the winds the winds uh have

11:21

started to pick up we're still looking

11:23

to be below our limits but there could

11:25

be a hold at tus 40 seconds just to make

11:28

sure that the winds are acceptable

11:30

before we go we are actively loading

11:32

propellant on board the vehicle you can

11:34

see by the frost line starting to build

11:36

up looks like we're about 80% on the

11:38

ship main tanks right now and a little

11:41

over 60% on the booster now Starship

11:45

uses liquid methane as its fuel liquid

11:48

oxygen as its oxidizer both of those get

11:50

cooled down to a cryogenic temperat so

11:53

several hundred degrees below zero and

11:56

if you followed along with our previous

11:57

two flight tests the propo timeline

11:59

today looks a little bit different those

12:01

first flight tests took us about 90

12:03

minutes to load all of the prop on board

12:05

but since the second flight we made some

12:08

pretty significant upgrades to make that

12:09

time shorter we added some additional

12:12

Fuel and locks pumps just to increase

12:14

our capacity we expanded the number of

12:16

heat exchangers and installed a

12:18

dedicated fill drain line for each stage

12:20

but they were sharing one before now

12:22

they each have their own that's just

12:24

that main Pathway to get the propell to

12:26

the vehicle we're aiming for about 51

12:28

minutes for today's operation to fully

12:31

load prop we did that successfully on

12:33

our first on our wet dress rehearsal

12:35

that we did recently eventually though

12:37

we're trying to get that time down to

12:38

about 40 minutes just for some contents

12:41

context that's about five minutes longer

12:43

than we take on Falcon 9 but we're doing

12:45

it with 10 times the amount of

12:47

propellant now the propellant load on

12:49

ship started at about T minus 53 minutes

12:51

booster right around t- 42 minutes uh we

12:55

are about to pause loading on the main

12:57

tanks of ship switch over to the header

12:58

tank s and then switch back to close out

13:01

the main tanks we're expecting all of

13:03

the prop to be on ship at about tus 3

13:05

minutes 30 seconds and then booster prop

13:08

load ends at T minus 2 minutes and 50

13:10

seconds now our final countdown and

13:13

startup sequence is going to be the same

13:15

as flight two we already tested this on

13:17

this booster when we did it static fire

13:20

looking back for flight one we lit those

13:23

Raptor engines on the booster and lifted

13:24

off about 6 seconds later flight two we

13:27

reduced that time by almost 2 seconds

13:29

that just helps reduce the stress on the

13:31

ground systems improve the efficiency of

13:33

the rocket but right now we're just

13:36

about to past 18 minutes away from

13:38

launch winds again they're still looking

13:40

a little bit marginal so we'll keep an

13:42

eye on those we're not working any other

13:44

technical issues and the range is

13:46

expected to be green if we can't make

13:48

our test today we have backup launch

13:51

opportunities in the coming days could

13:53

be 24 to 48 hours all just depends on

13:55

how far we get into the count so check

13:58

back in with every in just a little bit

14:00

for now though I'm going to send it back

14:01

to Kate and Shiva out at

14:03

Hawthorne thanks Dan the countdown is

14:06

continuing to progress so let's take a

14:08

closer look at the world's most powerful

14:10

launch vehicle ever developed Starship

14:13

is comprised of two elements the ship

14:15

which has six Raptor engines and the

14:17

super heavy booster which has 33 Raptor

14:20

engines Starship is capable of about

14:22

twice the thrust of the Saturn 5 rocket

14:25

and with future engine upgrades it will

14:27

actually be three times as three times

14:29

more powerful now with those future

14:32

improvements that'll allow Starship to

14:34

carry somewhere between 150 and 250

14:37

metric tons to orbit depending on the

14:39

configuration for reference Falcon 99's

14:41

heaviest payload to date is just over 17

14:44

metric tons so at Starship we're talking

14:46

about an order of magnitude greater in

14:48

terms of payload capability to orbit and

14:51

that matters because the amount of mass

14:52

we able to launch per rocket is critical

14:55

to creating a self-sustaining City on

14:58

Mart in terms of size the super heavy

15:01

booster alone stands about 71 M or 233

15:05

feet tall and is about the same height

15:07

as a fully integrated Falcon 9 the ship

15:10

stands about 50 m or 160 feet tall

15:14